The Divided Welfare State: The Battle Over Public and Private Social Benefits in the United States

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Business & Economics - 447 pages
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The Divided Welfare State is the first comprehensive political analysis of America's distinctive system of public and private social benefits. Everyone knows that the American welfare state is unusual--less expensive and extensive, later to develop and slower to grow, than comparable programs abroad. Yet, U.S. social policy does not stand out solely for its limits. American social spending is actually as high as spending is in many European nations. What is truly distinctive is that so many social welfare duties are handled not by the state, but by the private sector with government support. With sweeping historical reach and a wealth of statistical and cross-national evidence, The Divided Welfare State demonstrates that private social benefits have not merely been shaped by public policy, but have deeply influenced the politics of public social programs--to produce a social policy framework whose political and social effects are strikingly different than often assumed. At a time of fierce new debates about social policy, this book is essential to understanding the roots of America's distinctive model and its future possibilities. Jacob S. Hacker is the Peter Strauss Family Assistant Profesor of Political Science at Yale University. Previously, he was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard Society of Fellows and Fellow at the New America Foundation as well as a Guest Scholar and Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution. He is the author of The Road to Nowhere: The Genesis of President Clinton's Plan for Health Security (Princeton, 1997), which was co-winner of the 1997 Louis Brownlow Book Award of the National Academy of Public Administration. His articles and opinion pieces have appeared in The New Republic, The Nation, the Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, and Washington Post. A regular media commentator, he has discussed his work widely on C-Span, national public radio and in papers nationwide.
  

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The divided welfare state: the battle over public and private social benefits in the United States

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Hacker (political science, Yale) tries to explain why "the United States devotes much less of its economy to government social spending than do other Western nations" by meticulously tracing the ... Read full review

Review: The Divided Welfare State

User Review  - Ben Trump - Goodreads

A solid history of America's efforts towards health reform, but very dense for a casual reader. Those professionally interested in the field will enjoy. Read full review

Contents

The Politics of Public and Private Social Benefits
28
The Politics of Public and Private Pensions
67
Introduction
71
Connected at Birth Public and Private Pensions Before 1945
85
Sibling Rivalry Public and Private Pensions After 1945
124
The Politics of Public and Private Health Insurance
175
Introduction
179
Seeds of Exceptionalism Public and Private Health Insurance Before 1945
191
The Elusive Cure Public and Private Health Insurance After 1945
221
The Formation and Future of the American Welfare Regime
271
The Formation of the American Welfare Regime
275
The Future of the American Welfare Regime
313
Appendix
337
Notes
341
Index
435
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About the author (2002)

Jacob S. Hacker is the Stanley B. Resor Professor of Political Science at Yale University. A Fellow at the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C., he is the author of "The Great Risk Shift: The New Economic Insecurity and the Decline of the American Dream "(a "New York Times "'editors' choice), "The Divided Welfare State, "and, with Paul Pierson, of "Off Center: The Republican Revolution and the Erosion of American Democracy." He has appeared recently on "The NewsHour, MSNBC, All Things Considered, "and "Marketplace." He lives in New Haven, CT.

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