American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past

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University of Chicago Press, 1997 - Nature - 300 pages
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Pronghorn antelope are the fastest runners in North America, clocked at speeds of up to 100 kilometers per hour. Yet none of their current predators can come close to running this fast. Pronghorn also gather in groups, a behavior commonly viewed as a "safety in numbers" defense. But again, none of their living predators are fearsome enough to merit such a response.

In this elegantly written book, John A. Byers argues that these mystifying behaviors evolved in response to the dangerous predators with whom pronghorn shared their grassland home for nearly four million years: among them fleet hyenas, lions, and cheetahs. Although these predators died out ten thousand years ago, pronghorn still behave as if they were present—as if they were living with the ghosts of predators past.

Byers's provocative hypothesis will stimulate behavioral ecologists and mammalogists to consider whether other species' adaptations are also haunted by selective pressures from predators past. The book will also find a ready audience among evolutionary biologists and paleontologists.

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JSTOR: American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of ...
BOOK REVIEWS American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past. By ja Byers. Univer- sity of Chicago Press, Chicago, IL, USA. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0022-541X(199810)62%3A4%3C1580%3AAPSAAT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-0

GHOST OF THE DESERT:
GHOST OF THE DESERT: THE PRONGHORN. By Ron Harton. The wind sweeps across the desert and sculpts our parkas around our backs. We try to hold our binoculars ...
naturewriting.com/ ghostpr.htm

Trends in Ecology & Evolution : Haunted hypotheses - Published by ...
American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past by ja Byers The University of Chicago Press, 1998. $70.00/£55.95 hbk, $23.95/£19.25 ...
linkinghub.elsevier.com/ retrieve/ pii/ S0169534798014748

Byers Lab: Publications, Department of Biological Sciences ...
Byers Lab: Publications, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho
www.sci.uidaho.edu/ biosci/ labs/ byers/ publications/

Book Reviews
BOOK REVIEWS. Six Roads from Newton: Great Discoveries in. Physics. Edward Speyer. 1994. John Wiley & Sons. 189 pp. $14.95. ...
kb.osu.edu/ dspace/ bitstream/ 1811/ 23779/ 1/ V098N2_030.pdf

Pronghorn's Speed May Be Legacy of Past Predators - New York Times
In a book to be published next year by the University of Chicago Press, ''American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past,'' Dr. ...
query.nytimes.com/ gst/ fullpage.html?res=9502E0D71031F937A15751C1A960958260

Pronghorns-Survivors of the American Savanna - National Zoo| FONZ
In his landmark book, American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past, University of Idaho biologist John Byers argues that a host ...
nationalzoo.si.edu/ Publications/ ZooGoer/ 2001/ 6/ pronghornssavanna.cfm

LIBRARY LETTERS GAIA’S BODY 315
Global Ecology and Biogeography (1999) 8, 315–319. LIBRARY LETTERS. GAIA’S BODY. it is more descriptive than analytical. But in other ways ...
www.blackwell-synergy.com/ doi/ pdf/ 10.1046/ j.1466-822X.1999.00083.x

BIOONE Online Journals - Adult and fawn mortality of Sonoran pronghorn
American pronghorn: social adaptations and the ghosts of predators past. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Byers ja, and jd Moodie. ...
www.bioone.org/ perlserv/ ?request=get-document& doi=10.2193%2F0091-7648(2005)33%5B43%3AAAFMOS%5D2.0.CO%3B2

Chicago Journals - The Quarterly Review of Biology
American Pronghorn: Social Adaptations and the Ghosts of Predators Past John A. Byers. The Quarterly Review of Biology. Published in Association with Stony ...
www.journals.uchicago.edu/ cgi-bin/ resolve?id=doi:10.1086/ 393050

About the author (1997)

John A. Byers is Professor of Zoology, University of Idaho.

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