Designing with Web Standards

Front Cover
New Riders, 2003 - Computers - 436 pages
13 Reviews

You code. And code. And code. You build only to rebuild. You focus on making your site compatible with almost every browser or wireless device ever put out there. Then along comes a new device or a new browser, and you start all over again.

You can get off the merry-go-round.

It's time to stop living in the past and get away from the days of spaghetti code, insanely nested table layouts, tags, and other redundancies that double and triple the bandwidth of even the simplest sites. Instead, it's time for forward compatibility.

Isn't it high time you started designing with web standards?

Standards aren't about leaving users behind or adhering to inflexible rules. Standards are about building sophisticated, beautiful sites that will work as well tomorrow as they do today. You can't afford to design tomorrow's sites with yesterday's piecemeal methods.Jeffrey teaches you to:

  • Slash design, development, and quality assurance costs (or do great work in spite of constrained budgets)
  • Deliver superb design and sophisticated functionality without worrying about browser incompatibilities
  • Set up your site to work as well five years from now as it does today
  • Redesign in hours instead of days or weeks
  • Welcome new visitors and make your content more visible to search engines
  • Stay on the right side of accessibility laws and guidelines
  • Support wireless and PDA users without the hassle and expense of multiple versions
  • Improve user experience with faster load times and fewer compatibility headaches
  • Separate presentation from structure and behavior, facilitating advanced publishing workflows
  

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User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Just fuck you and your 12 years long "web-standards" bullshit demagogy and propaganda.

Review: Designing With Web Standards

User Review  - Overstock.com

This is a great book for getting up to speed with today's web standards and where the web is heading. A great read! ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
1
One Size Does Not Fit All
2
On Their Way Out?
3
A Continuum Not a Set of Inflexible Rules
5
Show Dont Sell
6
Let Your Work Do the Selling for You
7
The Smell of Change
8
Before You Begin
13
Same as Last Pass Markup
206
The First Table
207
The Second Table
209
CSS Basics
211
CSS Overview
212
Anatomy of Styles
214
Multiple Declarations
215
Whitespace and Case Insensitivity
216

Spiraling Costs Diminishing Returns
14
Ending the Cycle of Obsolescence
16
What Is Forward Compatibility?
17
No Rules No Dogma
18
Practice Not Theory
20
Is This Trip Really Necessary?
21
999 of Websites Are Obsolete
23
Modern Browsers and Web Standards
24
New Code for a New Job
25
The Version Problem
26
Backward Thinking
29
The Cost to Site Owners
30
Backward Compatibility
34
The Road to Stupidville
38
When Good Things Happen to Bad Markup
39
The Cure
42
Designing and Building with Standards
45
Jumping Through Hoops
47
The Cost of Design Before Standards
48
Modern Site Ancient Ways
49
The Trinity of Web Standards
53
Structure
54
Presentation
55
Behavior
56
Benefits of Transitional Methods
57
Portability in Action
60
One Document Serves All
63
Design Beyond the Screen
66
Time and Cost Savings Increased Reach
67
Where We Go from Here
68
Transitional Forward Compatibility
69
Strict Forward Compatibility
71
The Trouble with Standards
73
Lovely to Look At Repulsive to Code
74
Common Goals Common Means
76
The Year That Browsers Came of Age
78
Netscapes Bold Move
81
Too Little Too Late?
83
Bad Browsers Lead to Bad Practices
84
Inherit the Wind
86
Miss Behavior to You
87
Standardized Scripting at Long Last
88
Academics Versus Economics
90
Product Awareness Versus Standards Awareness
91
The F Word
93
The Value of Flash
94
The Trouble with Flash
96
Compliance Is a Dirty Word
97
The Inspiration Problem
98
Other Problems
99
XML Conquers the World And Other Web Standards Success Stories
101
The Universal Language XML
102
One Parent Many Children
104
More Popular Than MTV
106
Builds Strong Data Five Ways
108
Web Publishing Tools for the Rest of Us
110
XML Applications and Your Site
112
Still in Its Infancy
113
A New Era of Cooperation
114
How Suite It Is
115
Web Standards and Authoring Tools
117
WYSIWYG Tools Come of Age Two Out of Three Aint Bad
119
The Emergence of CSS Layout
120
The Flood Begins
124
Countless Converts and the Help Sites They Rode in On
126
Faddishnesswith a Purpose
128
The Mainstreaming of Web Standards
129
Commercial Sites Take the Plunge
131
Wired Digital Converts
132
Embracing Standards with Transitional Methods
136
Executive Summary
137
Modern Markup
141
The Secret Shame of Rotten Markup
145
A Reformulation of Say What?
147
Executive Summary
149
Top 10 Reasons to Convert to XHTML
150
Top 5 Reasons Not to Switch to XHTML
152
XHTML Restructuring the Web
153
Simple Rules Easy Guidelines
154
Declare Your Content Type
157
Write All Tags in Lowercase
159
Quote All Attribute Values
162
All Attributes Require Values
163
Close Empty Tags Too
164
Encode All and Characters
165
The Dull the Duller and the Truly Dull
166
Structural HealingIts Good for Me
167
Marking Up Your Document for Sense Instead of Style
168
Visual Elements and Structure
171
Tighter Firmer Pages Guaranteed Structure and MetaStructure in Strict and Hybrid Markup
173
Must Every Element Be Structural?
174
div id and Other Assistants
175
Dare to Do Less
178
Dos and Donts
181
Common Errors in Hybrid Markup
182
divs Are Just All Right
185
Loving the id
186
Banish Redundant Table Cells
188
Outdated Methods on Parade
189
Slicing and Dicing
191
In Defense of Navigational Table Layouts
192
The Redundant Verbosity of Redundantly Verbose Tables
193
Bad CSS Comes to Town
194
Moving On
196
XHTML by Example A Hybrid Layout Part I
197
Benefits of Transitional Methods Used in These Chapters
198
CSS and Accessibility Advantages
200
Additional id Attributes
205
Alternative and Generic Values
217
Grouped Selectors
218
Contextual Descendant Selectors
220
id Selectors and Contextual id Selectors
221
Class Selectors
222
Combining Selectors to Create Sophisticated Design Effects
223
External Embedded and Inline Styles
226
Inline Styles
229
The BestCase Scenario Design Method
230
Relative and Absolute File References
232
CSS in Action A Hybrid Layout Part II
235
Preparing Images
236
Establishing Basic Parameters
238
Hide and Block
239
Coloring the Links Introducing PseudoClasses
240
Sketching in Other Common Elements
243
More About Font Sizes
244
Laying Out the Page Divisions
246
First Pass
250
First Try at Second Pass
253
Final Pass
254
External Styles and the You Are Here Effect
255
Working with Browsers Part I DOCTYPE Switching and Standards Mode
259
The Saga of DOCTYPE Switching
260
A Switch to Turn Standards On or Off
261
Throwing the Switch
262
The DOCTYPE Switch
263
Complete and Incomplete DOCTYPEs
264
A Complete Listing of Complete XHTML DOCTYPEs
265
Celebrate Browser Diversity Or at Least Learn to Live with It
268
From Vive la Difference to This
272
Working with Browsers Part II Box Models Bugs and Workarounds
273
The Box Model and Its Discontents
274
How the Box Model Works
275
How the Box Model Breaks
276
Making CSS Safe for Democracy
283
The Whitespace Bug in IEWindows
285
The Float Bug in IE6Windows
289
Objects of Desire?
291
Embedding Multimedia While Supporting Standards
292
Object Failures
294
A Workaday Workaround World
296
Working with Browsers Part III Typography
299
User Control
300
Points of Difference
302
A Standard Size at LastBut for How Long?
303
Good Works Undone with a Click
306
Great Performance Shame About the Size
308
The Heartbreak of Ems
313
Pixels Prove Pixels Work
315
Its Absolutely Relative
316
The Trouble with Pixels
318
The Font Size Keyword Method
321
Initial Problems with Keyword Implementations
322
The Fahrner Method
323
The Quest Continues
325
Accessibility Basics
327
Access by the Books
328
Widespread Confusion
330
The Law and the Layout
333
Accessibility Myths Debunked
335
A TextOnly Version Satisfies the Requirement for Equal or Equivalent Access
336
Accessibility Forces You to Create Primitive LowEnd Designs
338
According to Section 508 Sites Must Look the Same in All Browsers and User Agents
339
Dreamweaver MXWatchfires BobbyInsert Tool Name Here Solves All Compliance Problems
340
Designers Can Freely Ignore Accessibility Laws if Their Clients Tell Them To
341
Apples QuickTime and Other Streaming Video Media
343
Macromedia Flash 45
344
Color
346
CSS
347
Rollovers and Other Scripted Behaviors
348
Forms
350
Image Maps
351
Frames Applets
352
Tools of the Trade
353
Working with Bobby
354
Our Good Friend the tabindex Attribute
355
How You Benefit
359
Working with DOMBased Scripts
361
Meet the DOM
362
So Where Does It Work?
365
Deep DOM Details
367
Please DOM Dont Hurt Em
368
Showing and Hiding
372
Dynamic Menus DropDown and Expandable
377
Aiding Access Offering Choice
378
A CSS Redesign
383
Defining Goals
384
Method and Madness
386
Establishing Basic Parameters
389
Installing the Sidebar
391
The Positioning Part
392
Creating Color Bars
394
A Space for Content
395
RulesBased Design
397
A Home Button with CSS Rollover Effects
399
Additional Uses of Fahrner Image Replacement FIR
402
A CSSXHTML Navigation Bar
406
Adding the Style
407
Finishing Up
412
Modern Browsers The Good the Bad and the Ugly
419
The First Wave
420
Netscape 6+
421
Safari
422
MSIE 55Windows
423
Netscape 4
424
Index
425
Copyright

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References to this book

Advances in Computers
Franz Alt
No preview available - 2005
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About the author (2003)

Jeffrey Zeldman s personal web site (www.zeldman.com) has welcomed more than 16 million visitors and is read daily by thousands in the web design and development industry. In 1998, Zeldman co-founded The Web Standards Project (www.webstandards.org), a grassroots coalition of web designers and developers that helped end the Browser Wars by persuading Microsoft and Netscape to support the same technologies in their browsers.

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