Poems of Established Reputation: To Wit: 1st. The Art of Preserving Health (Google eBook)

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Warner & Hanna, 1802 - Poetry - 288 pages
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Page 224 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups, That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 63 - And impotent desire, and disappointed pride ? 9 0, how canst thou renounce the boundless store Of charms which Nature to her votary yields ? The warbling woodland, the resounding shore, The pomp of groves, and garniture of fields ; All that the genial ray of morning gilds, And all that echoes to the song of even, All that the mountain's sheltering bosom shields, And all the dread magnificence of heaven, O, how canst thou renounce, and hope to be forgiven ? 10 These charms shall work thy soul's eternal...
Page 94 - And darkness and doubt are now flying away ; No longer I roam in conjecture forlorn ; So breaks on the traveller, faint and astray, The bright and the balmy effulgence of morn: See Truth, Love, and Mercy, in triumph descending. And Nature all glowing in Eden's first bloom ! On the cold cheek of Death smiles and roses are blending, And Beauty Immortal awakes from the tomb.
Page 184 - Though thy clime Be fickle, and thy year most part deform'd With dripping rains, or wither'd by a frost, I would not yet exchange thy sullen skies, And fields without a flower, for warmer France With all her vines ; nor for Ausonia's groves Of golden fruitage, and her myrtle bowers.
Page 224 - Which not even critics criticise ; that holds Inquisitive attention, while I read, Fast bound in chains of silence, which the fair, Though eloquent themselves, yet fear to break ; What is it, but a map of busy life, Its fluctuations, and its vast concerns ? Here runs the mountainous and craggy ridge, That tempts ambition.
Page 283 - All kingdoms and all princes of the earth Flock to that light ; the glory of all lands Flows into her ; unbounded is her joy, And endless her increase. Thy rams are there. * Nebaioth, and the flocks of Kedar there, The looms of Ormus, and the mines of Ind, And Saba's spicy groves, pay tribute there.
Page 163 - Nor rural sights alone, but rural sounds, Exhilarate the spirit, and restore The tone of languid Nature. Mighty winds, That sweep the skirt of some far-spreading wood Of ancient growth, make music not unlike The dash of Ocean on his winding shore, And lull the spirit while they fill the mind ; Unnumber'd branches waving in the blast, And all their leaves fast fluttering, all at once.
Page 269 - From dearth to plenty, and from death to life, Is Nature's progress, when she lectures man In heavenly truth ; evincing, as she makes The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God.
Page 163 - Of neighbouring fountain, or of rills that slip Through the cleft rock, and chiming as they fall Upon loose pebbles, lose themselves at length In matted grass, that with a livelier green Betrays the secret of their silent course.
Page 259 - He looks abroad into the varied field Of nature, and though poor perhaps compared With those whose mansions glitter in his sight, Calls the delightful scenery all his own. His are the mountains, and the valleys his, And the resplendent rivers. His to enjoy With a propriety that none can feel, But who, with filial confidence inspired, Can lift to heaven an unpresumptuous eye, And smiling say

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