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Books Books 1 - 10 of 14 on ... eye some assistance for viewing that image as near as possible ; so that the....  
" ... eye some assistance for viewing that image as near as possible ; so that the angle which it shall subtend at the eye may be very large, compared with the angle which the object itself would subtend in the same situation. This is... "
The Book of English Trades: And Library of the Useful Arts : with Seventy ... - Page 272
by John Souter - 1818 - 442 pages
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The British encyclopedia, or, Dictionary of arts and sciences

William Nicholson - 1809
...the same situation. This is" done by means of an ryeglass, which so refracts the pencils of rays, as that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci, by the natural humours of the eye. But if the eye had been so formed an to be able to see the image, with...
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Encyclopædia Britannica: or, A dictionary of arts and sciences, compiled by ...

Encyclopaedia Britannica - 1810
...eye-glafs, which fo refrails the pencils of rays, that they may afterwards be brought to their lèverai foci by the humours of the eye. But if the eye was fo formed as to be able to fee the image with fufficient diilinanefs at the fame diftance without any...
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The Panorama of Science and Art: Embracing the Sciences of ..., Volume 1

James Smith - Technology - 1815
...in the same situation. This is accomplished by. means of an eye-glass, which so refracts the pencils of rays that they may afterwards be brought to their...eye. But if the eye was so formed as to be able to seethe image with sufficient distinctness at the same distance without an eye-glass, it would appear...
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Systematic education: or Elementary instruction in the various ..., Volume 2

William Shepherd, Jeremiah Joyce, Lant Carpenter - Education - 1815
...the same situation. This is done by means of an eye-glass, which so refracts the pencils of rays, as that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci by the natural humours of the eye. There are several kinds of telescopes, distinguished by the number and...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory, and N ...

John Mason Good, Olinthus Gilbert Gregory - 1819
...so formed as to !>•• able to tee the wuer, with loficirnt distinctness, at the sant« dwtaDcr, without an eye-glass, it would appear to him as much magnified as it dues to another perSM who makes use of a glass for that purpose, though he would aot, in all cases,...
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The Annals of Philosophy, Volume 15

Thomas Thomson, Richard Phillips, Edward William Brayley - Agriculture - 1820
...subtend in the same situation ; this is done by means of an eye-glass which so refracts the pencils of rays that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci by the natural humours of the eye. Now it is evident from the foregoing experiments that this theory is perfectly...
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Annals of Philosophy, Or, Magazine of Chemistry, Mineralogy ..., Volume 15

Thomas Thomson - Science - 1820
...would subl in the same situation ; this is done by means of an eye-glass which so refracts the pencils of rays that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci by the natural humours of the eye. Now it is evident from the foregoing- experiments that this theory is perfectly...
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American Edition of the British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of ..., Volume 12

William Nicholson - Science - 1821
...the same situation. This is done by means of an eye-glass, which so refracts the pencils of rays, as that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci, by the natural humours of the eye. But if the eye had been so formed as to be able to see the image with sufficient...
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British Encyclopedia: Or, Dictionary of Arts and Sciences ..., Volume 12

William Nicholson - Science - 1821
...the same situation. This is done by means of an eye-glass, which so refracts the pencils of rays, as that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci, by the natural humours of the eye. But if the eye had been so formed as to be able to see the image with sufficient...
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A general view of the sciences and arts, Volume 1

William Jillard Hort - Science - 1822
...that image as near as possible. This is done by means of an eye-glass, which so refracts the pencils of rays that they may afterwards be brought to their several foci by the humours of the eye. Such is the telescope which was first discovered and used by philosophers. The rays of light proceeding...
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