The International Law Commission of the United Nations

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Univ of South Carolina Press, Jan 1, 2000 - Law - 225 pages
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"Jeffrey S. Morton suggests that despite fifty years of operation and an impressive list of successes, the International Law Commission of the United Nations remains one of the world's least understood and appreciated legal institutions. In this appraisal of the organization, Morton sheds light on its functions and the process by which it pursues its stated goals of codifying and developing international law. He addresses the dearth of systematic analysis of the commission's work and specifically considers its progress on two monumental tasks: the establishment of a binding code of international crimes and the creation of a standing international court."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  

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Contents

International Crimes
19
The Draft Code of Crimes
37
The International Criminal Court
54
Empirical Analysis of the International
74
Conclusion
102
Appendix Al Draft Code of Crimes against the Peace
115
Appendix B Statute of the International Criminal Court
133
Database
157
Notes
199
Index
219
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Jeffrey S. Morton is Associate Professor of International Law and Politics and Paul Forage is Assistant Professor of History, both at Florida Atlantic University. Stefano Bianchini is Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Central-Eastern Europe and the Balkans at the University of Bologna. Craig Nation is Professor of military studies in the Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College.

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