Masks, Transformation, and Paradox

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University of California Press, 1986 - Art - 282 pages
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Masks are found world-wide in connection with seasonal festivals, rites of passage, and curative ceremonies. They provide a means of investigating the paradoxical problems that appearances pose in the experience of transitional states. In this far-reaching work, A. David Napier studies mask iconography and the role played by masks in the realization of change. The masks of preclassical Greece¯in particular those of the Satyr and the Gorgon¯provide his starting point. A comparison of Greek to Eastern and especially Indian models follows, and the book concludes with an examination of the interpretation of Hindu ideas in Bali that demonstrates the importance of ambivalence in mask iconography.
  

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I learned how to use the word apotropaic from this book. Read full review

Contents

The Problem of Prima
4
Interpreting Transformations
10
Supernatural
20
Masks and the Beginnings of Greek Drama
30
Aristotles Testimony
36
Satyr Centaur Theriomorphic Healer
45
Its Character and Iconography
53
IndoEuropean Elements in the Satyrs and Centaurs
63
Centaurs Ambivalence and Curing
79
Perseus and the Gorgon Head
83
q The Third Eye
135
Balinese Faces and Indian Prototypes
188
Notes
225
Bibliography
243
Index
269
Copyright

Centaurs and Heracles
71

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About the author (1986)

A. David Napier is Associate Professor of Art and Anthropology at Middlebury College and Fellow in Medical and Psychiatric Anthropology at the Harvard Medical School. He is the author of "Masks, Transformation, and Paradox" (California, 1986).

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