The History of Arizona: From the Earliest Times Known to the People of Europe to 1903 (Google eBook)

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Whitaker & Ray Company, 1905 - Arizona - 199 pages
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Traces the settlement of the Arizona territory by the United States, from the Gadsden Purchase until the early 20th century, with descriptions of the geographies and economies of each county.
  

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Page 67 - ... discovered that he was to be met with arms. He reiterated his peaceable intent, though admitting in the same sentence that nine hundred men were on their way to join him. He accused the Mexicans of poisoning the wells and instigating the Papagos against him and his men. His letter concluded with a threat: But have a care, sir, for whatever we may be caused to suffer shall return upon the heads of you and of those who assist you! I had never considered it possible that you would have defiled yourselves...
Page 154 - ... consisted of a military post surrounded by a corral, and that there were but two or three houses outside of it. The country was covered with horses and cattle and on many of the trails they were so plentiful that it was quite inconvenient to get through the immense herds. They were valuable only for the hides and tallow, and a good sized steer was worth only three dollars. This country then belonged to Spain and the troops were paid in silver coin, and on all the coin the name of Ferdinand I...
Page 69 - most happy firesides with and among yon." Pesquiera answered himself, with a bombastic proclamation to his people, whom he summoned to fly, "to chastise with all the fury that can scarcely be contained in a heart swelling with resentment against coercion, the savage filibuster who has dared, in an unhappy hour, to tread our nation's soil and to arouse, insensate, our wrath.
Page 41 - The president, in his messages of 1857-8, recommended a territorial government; Senator Gwin in December 1857 introduced a bill to organize such a government for the Gadsden purchase, under the name of Arizona; the legislature of New Mexico in February 1858 passed resolutions in favor of the measure, though recommending a north and south boundary line on the meridian of 109, and also the removal of all New Mexican Indians to northern Arizona; several favorable petitions were received from different...
Page 135 - Maricopa mine, determined by me with a fine cistern barometer, is 3,378 feet above the level of .the sea, and 1,497 feet higher than our camp established on the Gila river six miles off, selected as a good site for smelting works. WR Hopkins, civil engineer, in connection with the same report, speaks as follows : * * * We have traced the copper lode by distinct pieces of heavy ore for 1,600 feet, about east and west ; also, three other veins. The lode appears to be from 8 to 12 feet wide on the surface.
Page 42 - May 22, June 23, 1859. held at Tucson a constitutional convention composed of 31 delegates, which proceeded to "ordain and establish" a provisional constitution to remain in force ' ' until congress shall organize a territorial government and no longer." The new territory included all of New Mexico south of latitude 33 40', and was divided by north and south lines into four counties. A governor was elected in the person of Dr LS Owings of Mesilla; three judicial districts were created, the judges...
Page 68 - ... among an enemy destitute of humanity. But, as against my companions now here, and those who are to arrive, I protest against any wrong step. Finally, you must reflect; bear this in mind: if blood is shed, on your hands be it and not on mine. Nevertheless, you can assure yourself and continue with your hostile preparations; for, as for me, I shall at once proceed to where I have intended to go for some time, and am ready to start. I am the leader, and my purpose is to act in accordance with the...
Page 134 - There are evidences of work done upon them in years past. MARICOPA LODE. This lode, sometimes called Gray's mine, situated about 70 miles north of Tucson and four miles south of the Gila river, is considered one of the best copper deposits in southern Arizona. Mr. Gray thus described .the vein in a general report, made in 1860 : The formation of the district is primitive, chiefly granite and sienite, with metamorphic ,and sedimentary rocks, and injected dikes of trap and quartz.
Page 136 - The specimens consisted of the outcrop ore of a powerful vein, and bear the unmistakable signs of a true vein. * * As commonly by all outcrop ore, so here carbonates and silicates make their appearance, while the main body of the vein, to some extent below...
Page 156 - Indians, who came to the rescue in large numbers, attacking the Apaches on two sides, driving them off and killing many. The next time the sentinel on the hill west of town discovered them coming ; he gave the alarm, and after a severe fight, the Indians were driven off. The Apaches had no firearms in those days, and were armed with spears, bows and arrows. "She referred to the pleasant times they used to have when their wants were few and easily supplied, and told how they danced and played and...

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