Aspects of Worker Well-being

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Solomon W. Polachek, Olivier Bargain
Elsevier JAI, 2007 - Business & Economics - 466 pages
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This volume contains thirteen new and original chapters on topics relating to worker well-being. It deals directly with how economic institutions affect individual and family earnings distributions. Topics covered include job training, worker and firm mobility, unions, collective bargaining, minimum wages, unemployment insurance and schooling. Among the questions answered are: To what extent do greater work hours of women mitigate the widening of the family earnings distribution? To what extent does the decline in unionization widen the distribution of earnings? To what extent do computers expand the earnings distribution? To what extent does the Russian wage distribution change if one accounted for wage arrears? To what extent does business relocation bring about job creation and job destruction? To what extent does maternal education increase childrens education? To what extent do job skills matter for low-income workers? And finally, why do minimum wage increases often fail to lead to increases in unemployment?
*Thirteen new and original chapters containing research on aspects of worker well-being.
*Includes job training, worker and firm mobility, unions, collective bargaining, minimum wages, unemployment insurance and schooling.
*Each chapter written by experts in the field.

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About the author (2007)

Solomon W. Polachek is Distinguished Professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton (Binghamton University), where he has taught since 1983. He holds appointments in the Economics and Political Science Departments, and from 1996-2000 he served as Dean of the Arts and Sciences College. His Ph.D. is from Columbia University, and he has held post-doctoral fellowships at the University of Chicago, Stanford University, and Princeton.

Solomon W. Polachek is Distinguished Professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton (Binghamton University), where he has taught since 1983. He holds appointments in the Economics and Political Science Departments, and from 1996-2000 he served as Dean of the Arts and Sciences College. His Ph.D. is from Columbia University, and he has held post-doctoral fellowships at the University of Chicago, Stanford University, and Princeton.

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