The Shape of Sola Scriptura

Front Cover
Canon Press & Book Service, 2001 - Religion - 363 pages
10 Reviews
In what shape do we find the doctrine of sola Scriptura today? Many modern Evangelicals see it as a license to ignore history and the creeds in favor of a more splintered approach to the Christian living. In the past two decades, Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox apologists have strongly tried to undermine sola Scriptura as unbiblical, unhistorical, and impractical. But these groups rest their cases on a recent, false take on sola Scriptura. The ancient, medieval, and classical Protestant view of sola Scriptura actually has a quite different shape than most opponents and defenders maintain. Therein lies the goal of this book-an intriguing defense of the ancient (and classical Protestant) doctrine of sola Scriptura against the claims of Rome, the East, and modern Evangelicalism. "The issue of sola Scriptura is not an abstract problem relevant only to the sixteenth-century Reformation, but one that poses increasingly more serious consequences for contemporary Christianity. This work by Keith Mathison is the finest and most comprehensive treatment of the matter I've seen. I highly recommend it to all who embrace the authority of sacred Scripture." -R.C. Sproul, Ligonier Ministries
  

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Review: The Shape of Sola Scriptura

User Review  - Gary - Goodreads

While a little repetitive, this work does a good job exposing Solo Scriptura as an Anabaptistic novelty and a departure from the reformed idea of Sola Scriptura. It also handles contemporary Romanist ... Read full review

Review: The Shape of Sola Scriptura

User Review  - Richard Jones - Goodreads

The best presentation and defense of the Reformed doctrine of Sola Scriptura. In the end, I still swam the Tiber. Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
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i
Foreword
ii
In this light the various widely publicized departures of many Evangelicals to Roman Catholicis
12
Introduction
13
Within evangelicalism many professing Christians use sola scriptura as a battle cry to justify e
14
The purpose of this book is twofold First it is an attempt to clear away some of the often misl
15
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16
Jesus continues And I also say to you that you are Peter petros and on this rock petra I w
188
None of this requires that conservative Roman Catholic views be endorsed The text says
189
Jesus also promises that the gates of Hades shall not prevail against His Church There have be
190
Another text that is often used in support of the Roman doctrine of ecclesiastical authority and
191
Why does Jesus pray for Peter and not for the other eleven? The singular and plural pronouns in t
192
Ray also observes that Peter was the leader of the twelve However since this is not disputed no
193
If there is any text outside of Matthew 16 that is considered by Roman Catholicism to be a virtua
194
It is helpful to begin by examining what the early church fathers said regarding this text of Scr
195

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18
The Early Church
19
HarperCollins 1978 2
20
As already noted we have broad scholarly agreement that Scripture and tradition were not mutuall
21
The fact that the Lord committed his teaching to the Church is also signiWcant in the thought of
22
The University of Chicago Press 1971 92 Cf HEW Turner The Pattern of Christian
23
When the summary of the apostolic tradition is called the rule of faith or the rule of truth the
24
Tertullians explanation of the relationship between the Scripture tradition and the Church doe
25
the belief that there is only one God and that He is none other than the Creator of the world w
26
Further testimony demonstrating patristic belief in the one source understanding of Gods selfre
27
Let nothing be innovated says he nothing maintained except what has been handed down Whence i
28
In a letter from Firmilian the Bishop of Caeserea to Cyprian regarding Pope Stephens actions
29
Like earlier heretics the Arians appealed to Scripture and in fact insisted that all discussion
30
The concern for interpreting the authoritative Scriptures within the context of the apostolic fai
31
1 The immediate divine origin of tradition together with the insistence on a clearly circumscrib
32
It is in the fourthcentury writings of Basil the Great that we Wnd for the Wrst time the suggest
33
St Basil is referring here to what is now denoted as disciplina arcani The discipline of secre
34
dogma is ke
35
But while the latter proceeded on the subject of the soul as far in the direction of supposed c
36
The Christian Faith which in accordance with the command of our Lord has been preached to all n
37
Unlike Basil and Gregory of Nyssa whose support of Tradition II is ambiguous at best John seems
38
15 John says that
39
If this were all Augustine said we could conWdently conclude that he shared the same concept of
40
In addition to the comments Augustine made regarding Scripture and tradition there are numerous
41
The evidence does however lend possible support to Obermans assertion that Augustine is one of
42
Little is known of the author of the Comonitory The book is written under an assumed name but i
43
Moreover in the Catholic Church itself all possible care must be taken that we hold that faith
44
In Vincent we Wnd one of the fullest early examinations of the vexing problem of authority The
45
In the Wrst three centuries of the Church councils were occasional meetings held to discuss and
46
Similarly we Wnd that a patristic appeal to earlier fathers is not an appeal to an authority equ
47
In the fourth century the Wrst hints of a twosource concept of traditionone which allows for an
48
The Middle Ages
49
After brieXy examining these important contextual issues we will be able to see the medieval Chu
50
Although Rome traces the origins of the papacy to the Apostle Peter the historical evidence indi
51
The Wfth century witnessed dramatic events in the western half of the Roman Empire In ad 410 R
52
These Wfthcentury political and ecclesiastical events had long lasting eVects which are felt ev
53
The political developments over the next several centuries played a major role in the shaping of
54
One event of major signiWcance that occurred during the reign of Leo was the dispute with the Eas
55
Following the reign of Innocent the prestige of the papacy dropped rapidly The College of Cardi
56
Under Pope Leo X who reigned from 15131521 abuses reached a breaking point Nepotism and simon
57
In 1254 a dispute arose between mendicant friars and secular masters at the University of Paris
58
The Wrst major medieval Christian to assert a doctrine of papal infallibility was Peter Olivi a
59
Olivis new doctrine was virtually ignored for forty years but in 1322 Pope John XXII revoked th
60
In November 1324 John responded in the Bull Quia quorundam that the father of lies had led his
61
Despite its problems however Jeromes Latin translation of the Hebrew and Greek manuscripts was
62
In the Middle Ages the apocryphal books were commonly regarded as deuterocanonical Hugh of St
63
Another important medieval development in biblical study was the tradition of the gloss Muller e
64
1 The Historical historiaThe literal sense of the text that explains what happened
66
This phenomenon is readily observable in the commentaries of Aquinas which are almost exclusively
67
when all is said perhaps the most forceful reasons to believe that God has spoken truly cannot t
68
In the tenth and eleventh centuries the beginnings of a trend away from the Augustinian concept o
69
were not high realists Their position may be termed moderate realism While the universal idea
70
Scholasticism is best regarded as the medieval movement Xourishing in the period 12001500 whic
71
1 The emphasis on a return ad fontes to the sources
72
Heiko Oberman is careful to note that the concepts of Tradition I and Tradition II are obviously
73
The Wrst possible evidence of major development occurs in the twelfth century For most of the ea
74
Oberman argues that one cannot make such a neat distinction between doctrinal truths and liturgic
75
In theory the material suYciency of Holy Scripture is upheld long after it has been given up in p
76
Like the majority of the scholastic teachers of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries Thomas A
77
The work of the Franciscan William of Ockham marks a decisive turning point in the history of the
78
Ockhams purpose in raising the issue of the sources of faith in the Dialogus was the same as his
79
By the end of the Wfteenth century a number of rival authorities to Scripture had emerged which
80
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82
Martin Luther and John Calvin
83
One debate that Xared up again during the sixteenthcentury Reformation concerned the source and
84
Their desire was not to reject the Church or the apostolic faith their desire was to remove the
85
In July of 1505 as a twentyoneyearold student at the University of Erfurt Luther was returni
87
After his return from Rome Luther was transferred to Wittenberg to teach in the new university a
88
If you have a true faith that Christ is your Savior then at once you have a gracious God for fa
89
Plenary indulgences ie the remission of all temporal punishment due to sin had come into pro
90
It has already been noted that the pope at this time was Leo X 15131521 whose reign was one o
91
Luther had sent a copy of the ninetyfive theses to Albert of Mainz who promptly forwarded them t
92
The answer to that question is exceedingly complex Its roots lie in the situation of imperial an
93
Perhaps Luthers assertions and his criticisms of Rome may be understood better in light of what
94
We Wnd the Wrst public hints of Luthers concept of sola scriptura at the Leipzig debate between
95
The fact that Luther operated within the context of a Tradition I concept of authority may be gat
96
This position would not be restricted to that of Luther but would form a constitutive part of th
97
Luther was writing at a time when the papacy was vigorously reasserting her authority over agains
98
Luthers assertion that Scripture was the only infallible authority in matters of faith and his h
99
As a Protestant he subjected the authority of church councils to the authority of the word of Go
100
1 Authoritarian ReverenceRoman Catholicism
101
While traveling to the Protestant city of Strasbourg Calvin stopped in Geneva and was ultimately
103
Suppose we ponder how slippery is the fall of the human mind into forgetfulness of God how great
104
Such wranglers are neatly refuted by just one word of the apostle He testiWes that the church
105
Calvin continues with an explanation of the inward witness of the Holy Spirit to His own Word in
106
that those whom the Holy Spirit has inwardly taught truly rest up
107
In Book Four Calvin turns to a lengthy discussion of the Church Here we see how he conceives of
108
Calvin realizes this and devotes a fair amount of space to explaining why the forsaking of the Ro
109
Because of the centrality of this assertion Calvin devotes several lengthy arguments to proving
110
Calvin continues by turning his attention to the papacy itself He begins by arguing that it is u
111
He begins by pointing out the deplorable state of the theology found in Rome including blasphemo
112
Just as the priests and teachers of ancient Israel were subject to the Scripture as the standard
113
And what wonder if Christs bride and pupil be subject to her Spouse and Teacher so that she pay
114
In that council which the high priests and Pharisees convened at Jerusalem against Christ John 1
115
In response to Roman claims that the councils must be obeyed without question simply because men
116
Calvin points out that the problem with Romes claim is that she refers to contradictions with Sc
117
For this reason we freely inveigh against the tyranny of human tradition which is haughtily thrus
118
Calvins Institutes itself is a testimony to the fact that he believed Scripture should be interp
119
Until the sixteenth century the ancient doctrine of Tradition I and the newer doctrine of Traditi
120
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122
The Radical Reformation
123
In South Germany mystical Anabaptists such as Thomas Muntzer advocated revolution while paciWsti
124
Another group identiWed as part of the Radical Reformation was that referred to as spiritualists
125
the magisterial Reformers adopted a positive approach to tradition particularly the testimonia p
126
This understanding of the sola scriptura principle allowed the magisterial reformers to critici
127
It is important to realize that there were two very diVerent versions of the sola scriptura princ
128
The holy ecumenical and general Council of Trent lawfully assembled in the Holy Ghost the same
129
Contemporary witnesses show that although partim partim as a form o
130
Heiko Oberman also argues that Trent intended to teach the twosource view In addition to the ar
131
From the theological point of view we must take the text of the Council of Trent as it stands N
132
Much has happened in the Roman Catholic church since the Council of Trent oYcially elevated Tradi
133
The two notions of living development and binding authority of the teaching oYce of the Church to
134
A valid argument for a dogmatic tradition for the Churchs teaching in the past can be construct
135
for every human creature to be subject to the Roman PontiV Unam Sanctam Vatican II decrees th
136
This espousal of Tradition I was also expressed by Zwinglis successor Heinrich Bullinger in hi
137
The Reformation itself was rooted in the question of authority which it answered with the langua
138
The seventh paragraph brieXy describes the perspicuity of Scripture explaining that the primary
139
In order to guard this statement of the doctrine of Scripture against the possibility of an anaba
140
In contrast with the rationalists who tried to erect philosophical systems by means of reasoning
141
dare to use your own understanding This applies especially to re
142
Above all the American Revolution dramatically expanded the circle of people who considered th
143
In religious faith we have but one Father and one Master and the Bible the Bible is our only a
144
The Unitarian Noah Worchester argued that Christians would reject the doctrine of the Trinity if
145
In a discussion of the Protestant rule of faith Hodge explains that the word of God as contain
146
Protestants admit that as there has been an uninterrupted tradition of truth from the protevangel
147
Hodge explains what he means by common consent When Protestants speak of common consent of Chri
148
In our own day the confusion over the deWnition of sola scriptura is astounding The majority of
149
Nobody goes to the Bible alone but carries with him or her a host of inXuences It is inWnitely
150
The consensus of the early Church continued throughout most of the Middle Ages with most theologi
151
Many of the Radical Reformers of the sixteenth century not only rejected Tradition II but also Tr
152
If we are to maintain a sound Christian doctrine of authority we must with the early fathers and
153
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154
THE WITNESS OF SCRIPTURE
155
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156
Scripture on Scripture and Tradition
157
1011 is one of the most used and abused texts of Scripture in the ongoing debate The te
158
When we recall the diYculty Jesus own disciples had grasping the fact that He must suVer and die
159
Roman Catholic apologist Robert Sungenis overstates the case that can be made from Pauls new rev
160
Sungenis is correct when he says Pauls declaration that Jesus of Nazareth is the Messiah is a ne
161
Contrary to those evangelicals who advocate Tradition 0 there is nothing in this passage which w
162
All Scripture is given by inspiration of God and is proWtable for doctrine for reproof for cor
163
since Paul did command the Wrst Christians to preserve and obey oral revelation the Catholic Chu
164
By this admission White has unwittingly proven that Scripture does not teach sola scriptura for
165
It is this Godbreathed nature of Scripture that is signiWcant to the discussion of 2 Timothy 3
166
An important problem for Tradition II is the fact that it Wnds no support in the witness of the e
167
We also have the prophetic word made more sure which you do well to heed as a light that shines
168
In support of the Wrst position is the fact that elsewhere in the epistle Peter does deal extens
169
Peter makes an additional interesting comment later in his epistle The entirety of chapter 2 is
170
First the warning refers speciWcally to this book the book of Revelation John is not speakin
171
A second problem is that many individual doctrines and practices which she has declared to be pre
172
We must remember what happened to the law of Moses in Israel Because the Jews realized that Scri
173
The Wrst text is not often referred to in discussions on this topic but it does have some bearin
174
If the Church is in possession of the full apostolic tradition then we must ask why Luke found i
175
This text and the parallel passage in Matthew 15 indicate the degree to which a hermeneutical tra
176
This passage in Mark is dealt with by two authors in the Roman Catholic work Not By Scripture Alo
177
Second despite Protestant aversion to Catholic tradition it remains an incontrovertible fact th
178
The entire Roman Catholic argument depends upon the assumption that Rome could not do what Israel
179
The Thessalonian church has been troubled by some person or persons teaching them that the day of
180
SigniWcant to the discussion is the fact that Paul held up this apostolic tradition as a rule of
181
Scripture on the Church
183
Few passages of the New Testament have been the source of more discussion and debate in recent ce
184
Second the strong patristic tendency toward interpreting the rock as Christ necessitates the fal
185
Let us assume that the rock does refer to Peter What have we lost if we are Protestant or ga
186
The remaining arguments presented in support of the Roman interpretation of this passage are no m
187
The account of the Jerusalem Council in Acts 15 is very important for our understanding of the au
196
Then all the multitude kept silent and listened to Barnabas and Paul declaring how many miracles
197
The passage is illustrative of several aspects of apostolic ecclesiology First in the case of a
198
1722 is a signiWcant text because of its implications for the question of infallibilit
199
1722 that explicitly
200
Did tacit conditions apply only to a small class of unqualiWed predictions? Or did conditions att
201
The Epistle to the Galatians was written to a church on the verge of forsaking the gospel of Chri
202
89 is that Paul tells the church that even if he himself should b
203
We turn our attention now to a text that sheds more light on the nature of ecclesiastical authori
204
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206
THE THEOLOGICAL NECESSITY OF
207
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208
A Critique of Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Positions
209
This chapter will lay out some of the major diYculties inherent in both of the positions held wit
210
In addition to this the concept of tradition as a second supplementary source of revelation face
211
The second major problem with the supplementary concept of tradition is that there is no promise
212
A third signiWcant diYculty with the Roman concept of supplementary tradition is that it destroys
213
The sixth problem with this view of tradition is that it necessarily undermines the authority of
214
Not only does tradition undermine Scripture in many cases it also clearly contradicts Scripture
215
When we realize that Tradition II was not the teaching of the early Church for centuries and when
216
Because the Roman Catholic doctrine of infallibility is often misunderstood we must get clear on
217
Rome admits that the Wrst of these is practically unworkable and therefore emphasizes the second
218
A summary of the origin of the concept of papal infallibility appeared earlier This doctrine wh
219
During the Arian controversy Pope Liberius was exiled by the emperor for defending Nicene orthod
220
In his Bull Unam Sanctam Pope Boniface decreed
221
Pope Sixtuss notable error consisted of declaring his error Wlled 1590 edition of the Vulgate t
222
In regards to moral issues popes have also erred Pope Gregory IX 122741 allowed for the use
223
Scripture cannot be appealed to as a higher law because the Church tells us what Scripture is and
224
Not only is the doctrine of infallibility in direct contradiction with the express teaching of Sc
225
The Orthodox view the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament as Gods supreme revelation to man
226
In a very real sense it is the Church which embodies the tradition within Orthodoxy It is the Ch
227
A second major problem inherent in the Orthodox concept of tradition involves her understanding o
228
This is extremely important because if the Church does not know what it is that makes a council e
229
The Orthodox understanding is based on the belief that eventually the truth will prevail We know
230
As we have already noted Orthodox theology draws on the consistent Godinspired witness of the F
231
The fathers of the Church were also interpreters of this revelation fallible and human interpret
232
The most signiWcant problem with the Orthodox concept of Scripture and tradition is that like Ro
233
In both Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy this elevation of the present church to a place o
234
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236
A Critique of the Evangelical Doctrine of Solo Scriptura
237
Ironically a similar drastic alteration of the classical Reformation doctrine of sola scriptura
238
We have already seen that there is a major diVerence between the concept of Scripture and traditi
239
The typical modern Evangelical solution to this problem is to tell the inquirer to examine the ar
240
The same ideas were expressed by Lewis Sperry Chafer the extremely inXuential founder and Wrst p
241
An important point that must be kept in mind is observed by the great nineteenthcentury Princeto
242
Even if the creeds were to clearly and deWnitively stand against the preterist view which they d
243
Another pantelist John Noe claims that this rejection of the authority of the ecumenical creeds
244
Scripture itself indicates that the Scriptures are the possession of the Church and that the inte
245
An extremely signiWcant problem with solo scriptura is the subjectivity into which it casts all h
246
It should go without saying that solo scriptura was not the doctrine of the early Church or of th
247
Solo scriptura is beset with numerous theological problems the most signiWcant being the problem
248
Most proponents of solo scriptura simply ignore the problem of the canon as if the Bibles they ho
249
If the ecumenical creeds have no real authority then it cannot be of any major consequence if a
250
Not only has solo scriptura contributed heavily to this division and sectarianism it can oVer no
251
Ultimately the fundamental problem with solo scriptura is the same problem that exists within th
252
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254
The Doctrine of Sola Scriptura
255
When we speak of the perfection of Scripture in this particular context we are referring essenti
256
Wayne Grudem has provided a helpful deWnition of this characteristic of Scripture It means that
257
Although the suYciency of Scripture and the perfection of Scripture are to an extent synonymous
258
In the same way we may say that our Wnal authority is Scripture alone but not a Scripture that i
259
16 in which Paul tells Timothy that all Scripture is given
260
Throughout history some have claimed divine inspiration for supposed second sources of revelatio
261
Within the reciprocal nexus of Scripture Church and the rule of faith then Scripture occupies a
262
Even if the Roman Catholic church or the Eastern Orthodox church had a charism of infallibility
263
Finally we must always be mindful that claims to infallibility by the Church or any member of th
264
The unique authority of Scripture should be selfevident to any confessing Christian yet centuri
265
15
266
To assert that the Bible is the sole infallible authority and that the Bible is the Wnal and sup
267
It is only within the Church that we Wnd Scripture interpreted rightly and it is only within the
268
Let us learn even from the simple title mother how useful indeed how necessary it is that w
269
First we must observe that there is an enormous diVerence between the role the individual consci
271
The corporate judgment of the Church normally operates through those who have been especially gif
272
As Turretin observes it is this authority to establish normative doctrinal boundaries that has b
273
One of the most obvious facts facing any intelligent person who has been a Christian for more tha
274
Aside from the use of the Churchs common confessional rule of faith there is no possible way to
275
The Church today must regain the understanding of tradition held by the early Church and by the b
276
Tradition properly understood plays an important part in the Christian concept of scriptural au
277
The modern Evangelical church must come to the realization that if the ecumenical creeds have no
278
It is interesting to observe that the authority of these ecumenical creeds necessarily follows fr
279
The ecumenical creeds represent the hermeneutical consensus already reached by the Church They d
280
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282
OBJECTIONS AND ISSUES
283
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284
Answering Objections
285
Before proceeding it should be noted that a large percentage of the objections raised by critics
286
The problem with this argument is that if it is applicable at all it would only address a probl
287
Part of the diYculty involved in this discussion centers on the diVerence between the material su
288
One of the most frequent objections to sola scriptura found in Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodo
289
If Madrid is asking about Tradition I which was framed by the classical Reformers in terms of so
290
Second it assumes that the essential teachings of Scripture are suYciently clear to be underst
291
We shall respond to the objections in the order that they have been raised Blossers Wrst critic
292
The fourth objection mentioned concerns the canon of Scripture Because of its importance this o
293
One of the common attacks upon the doctrine of sola scriptura is an attack upon its historicity
294
who have not carefully stated the diVerence but the Roman Catholic apologists also bear some of
295
An interesting objection is raised by Blosser when he asserts A certain disdain for history an
296
Blosser continues his historical objections to sola scriptura by arguing that the doctrine overlo
297
We have already discussed the historical aspects of this debate at some length so it would be un
298
A further objection to sola scriptura presented by Roman Catholic apologists is the claim that th
299
Blosser argues that Protestant adherents of sola scriptura misinterpret the church fathers becaus
300
Once more we are faced with an objection that is based upon the unproven assumption that Roman Ca
301
Blosser argues that sola scriptura leads to a failure to distinguish matters of dogma from matter
302
Blosser claims that sola scriptura leads to a failure to reckon with history The Protestant doct
303
By the fulness of apostolic power we decree and declare that this edition approved by the autho
304
Sola scriptura Tradition I did not cause the hermeneutical anarchy that exists today but a pro
305
Intimately tied to the question of hermeneutical anarchy is the question of denominational factio
306
Blossers Wnal practical objection is that sola scriptura results in the undermining of pastoral
307
Carlton also argues No Father or council of the early church ever asserted that the Scriptures
308
The idea that the Scriptures are selfinterpreting is patently absurd It assumes a degree of abs
309
This is another of the reasons why Tradition I or sola scriptura is necessary Rather than depend
310
The doctrine of sola scriptura was part of an ongoing medieval debate between adherents of Tradit
311
Christians are to be in submission to the Church but the Church is not identical to Rome The di
312
The Canon the Church
313
Many evangelicals have not realized the force of this criticism and it is a devastating criticis
314
First it is extremely important for the purposes of this discussion to grasp the distinction bet
315
The next fact that is commonly agreed upon is that the Old Testament Jewish Church was fallible
316
The point is that the fallible Jewish Church was entrusted with the Old Testament books for aro
317
The Roman See did not express its opinion on the question of the canon until the Council of Flore
318
The Wrst observation we must make is that if sola scriptura is true then some form of a branch t
319
One could argue that his branch is the one true branch because it is closest to the teaching of S
320
In a sense the issue we are addressing is similar to the question of the canon of Scripture With
321
What this means practically speaking is that believers may immediately rule out such communions a
322
extra ecclesiam nul
323
Some communions such as Rome and Orthodoxy would argue that to speak of the visible Church as
324
The Church at the present time is in a temporary state analogous to that of Israel when she sinne
325
Those who are part of diVerent fragments will have slightly diVerent problems to face because e
326
Charles Hodge the great Reformed Princeton theologian addressed the question of Romes status i
327
Hodge notes that one of the diYculties involved in this question is the fact that the word churc
328
We have already observed that if salvation is possible within a particular communion then that c
329
Hodge continues by explaining the exact sense in which the true religion is present within these
330
If this creed were submitted to any intelligent Christian without his knowing whence it came cou
331
The most obvious objection that can be raised against Hodges argument in light of our discussion
332
The issue of Roman Catholic baptism raises an important point As noted above many of the Reform
333
What this means is that the problems raised concerning the relation of Rome to the true Church is
334
Regardless of where one lands on the issue of Romes status as a branch of the true visible Churc
335
What all of this means practically is that there is no good reason for Protestant conversions to
336
There is a tendency within the Church to run to extremes and this tendency manifests itself clea
337
The truth of the matter is that a proper concept of creeds does not result in the subordination o
338
Evangelical and cultic advocates of solo scriptura assume that an actual instance of inerrancy de
339
Liars are experts in chopping logic and missing the truth slightly Did God say not to eat from
340
An important point that Miller observes about creeds is the fact that men are seldom opposed to
341
As foreign as it may sound to individualistic modern Evangelical ears a church that adheres to s
342
Only sola scriptura or Tradition I does justice to the mystery involved in this intricate and b
343
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344
Conclusion
345
With the rise of Enlightenment rationalism and other trends such as American populism the radica
346
Instead of advocating chaos the Evangelical church must regain an understanding of the Reformati
347
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348
Bibliography
349
Calvin John Institutes of the Christian Religion Library of Christian Classics vols 2021 T
350
Evans Gillian R Alister E McGrath and Allan D Galloway The Science of Theology The History
351
The Protestant Position on the Bible Morgan PA Soli Deo Glor
352
TT Clark LTD 1986
353
Biblical Authority Creedal Orthodoxy and Heresy
354
Penguin Books 1993
355
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356
Index of Authors
357
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360
Index of Scripture
361
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366
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367
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368
Copyright

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References to this book

About the author (2001)

Mathison received a B.A. in Christianity and political science from Houston Baptist University and then studied at Dallas Theological Seminary for two years before completing his M.A. in theological studies from Reformed Theological Seminary. He earned a PhD in Christian thought from Whitefield Theological Seminary. He is director of curriculum development for Ligonier Ministries.

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