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Books Books 1 - 10 of 83 on Hardly anything had power to cause me even a few minutes' oblivion of it. For some....  
" Hardly anything had power to cause me even a few minutes' oblivion of it. For some months the cloud seemed to grow thicker and thicker. The lines in Coleridge's "Dejection" — I was not then acquainted with them — exactly describe my case: — A grief... "
Adolescence: its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology ... - Page 566
by Granville Stanley Hall - 1904
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 139

1874
...The lines in Coleridge's " Dejection " — I was not then acquainted with them — exactly describe my case : " A grief without a pang, void, dark and...sigh, or tear." ' In vain I sought relief from my favourite books ; those memorials of past nobleness and greatness from which I had always hitherto...
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Cyril Thornton

Thomas Hamilton - Fiction - 1827
...exertion. Mine WHS become • A grief without a pnng, void, Hark, and drear, A heavy, drowsy, unimpnssion'd grief, Which finds no natural outlet, or relief, In word, or sigh, or tear. t Even affection for my own family, which till novr had ever tenanted my bosom, appeared for a time...
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Destiny; or, The chief's daughter, Volumes 1-2

Susan Ferrier - 1831
...Hers was become — "A grief without a pang, void, dark, and drear, A stifled, drowsy, unimpassiou'd grief, Which finds no natural outlet or relief, In word, or sigh, or tear." Pride now seemed the only feeling alive in that heart where once had dwelt all the sweetest, softest...
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New Monthly Magazine, Volume 141

Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, William Harrison Ainsworth, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood - Literary Criticism - 1867
...?"ν[ And in time Edith's becomes A grief without a pang, void, dark, and dreary, A stifled, drowsy, unimpassioned grief, "Which finds no natural outlet or relief In word, or sigh, or tear. It is commonly remarked, as Mr. Herbert Spencer has said, that the * Diary of Madame d'Arblay, vol....
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new mouthly magazine

william harrison - 1867
...?"νf And in time Edith's becomes A grief without a pang, void, dark, and dreary, A stifled, drowsy, unimpassioned grief, Which finds no natural outlet or relief In word, or sigh, or tear. It is commonly remarked, as Mr. Herbert Spencer has said, that the * Diary of Madame d'Arblay, vol....
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Appletons' Journal, Volume 14

1875
...wear, whether she liked it or not. Coleridge refers to this sort of mind in his striking verse : " A grief without a pang, void, dark, and drear, A drowsy, stifled, unlmpassioned grief, Which finds no natural outlet of relief, In word, or sigh, or tear 1 " How many...
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Autobiography

John Stuart Mill - 1873
...The lines in Coleridge's " Dejection" — I was not then acquainted with them — exactly describe my case : " A grief without a pang, void, dark and...or sigh, or tear." In vain I sought relief from my favourite books ; those memorials of past nobleness and greatness from which I had always hitherto...
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The Living Age, Volume 119

1873
...oppression Which finds no natural outlet or relief of the thought that all feeling was dead within In word, or sigh, or tear." In vain I sought relief from my favourite books ; those memorials of past nobleness and greatness from which I had always hitherto...
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The City-road magazine

1874
...thicker. The lines in Coleridge's ' Dejection' — I was not then acquainted with them— exactly describe my case : 'A grief without a pang, void, dark, and...natural outlet or relief In word, or sigh, or tear.' " * It is clear as daylight that Stuart Mill was now realizing the utter insufficiency of any benevolent...
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The Christian observer [afterw.] The Christian observer and advocate

1874
...the means ? I seemed to have nothing left to live for. ... In vain I sought relief from my favourite books ; those memorials of past nobleness and greatness...had always hitherto drawn strength and animation. I road them now without feeling, or with the accustomed feeling mmws all its charm; and I became persuaded...
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