The life of Cardinal Wolsey: and Metrical visions from the original autograph manuscript, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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C. Whittingham, 1825
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Page xxxii - From his cradle, He was a scholar, and a ripe, and good one; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty, and sour, to them that lov'd him not; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer. And though he were unsatisfied in getting, (Which was a sin,) yet in bestowing, madam, He was most princely...
Page 317 - ... we came to the Abbey of Leicester, where, at his coming in at the gates, the abbot of the place, with all his convent, met him with the light of many torches ; whom they right honourably received with great reverence. To whom my lord said, ' Father Abbot, I am come hither to leave my bones among you...
Page 154 - I beseech you for all the loves that hath been between us, and for the love of God, let me have justice and right ; take of me some pity and compassion, for I am a poor woman and a stranger born out of your dominion ; I have here no assured friend, and much less indifferent counsel ; I Use to you as to the head of justice within this realm.
Page 50 - ... both of men and children. I have seen the King suddenly come in thither in a mask, with a dozen of other maskers, all in garments like shepherds, made of fine cloth of gold and fine crimson satin...
Page 167 - My lords, I thank you then," quoth she, u of your good wills ; but to make answer to your request I cannot so suddenly, for I was set among my maidens at work, thinking full little of any such matter, wherein there needeth a longer deliberation, and a better head than mine, to make answer to so...
Page 324 - I see the matter against me how it is framed; but if I had served God as diligently as I have done the king, he would not have given me over in my grey hairs 6.
Page 19 - The king was young and lusty, disposed all to mirth and pleasure, and to follow his desire and appetite, nothing minding to travail in the busy affairs of this realm : the which the almoner perceiving very well, took upon him, therefore, to disburden the king of so weighty a charge and troublesome business ; putting the king in comfort that he shall not need to spare any time of his pleasure for any business that...
Page 268 - With us the nobility, gentry and students do ordinarily go to dinner at eleven before noon, and to supper at five or between five and six at afternoon. The merchants dine and sup seldom before twelve at noon, and six at night, especially in London. The husbandmen dine also at high noon as they call it, and sup at seven or eight; but out of the term in our universities the scholars dine at ten.
Page 138 - I drink to the king my sovereign lord and master, and to the king your master," and therewith drank a good draught. And when he had done, he desired the Grand Master to pledge him cup and all, the which cup...
Page 54 - And with that he arose out of his chair, and offered the same to the gentleman in the black beard, with his cap in his hand. The person to whom he offered then his chair was Sir Edward Neville, a comely knight of a goodly personage, that much more resembled the king's person in that mask, than any other. The king, hearing and perceiving the cardinal so deceived in his estimation and choice, could not forbear laughing; but plucked down his visor, and Master Neville's, and dashed out with such a pleasant...

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