Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1999 - Social Science - 317 pages
11 Reviews
Updated Edition With a New Preface

Lila Abu-Lughod lived with a community of Bedouins in the Western Desert of Egypt for nearly two years, studying gender relations and the oral lyric poetry through which women and young men express personal feelings. The poems are haunting, the evocation of emotional life vivid. But her analysis also reveals how deeply implicated poetry and sentiment are in the play of power and the maintenance of a system of social hierarchy. What begins as a puzzle about a single poetic genre becomes a reflection on the politics of sentiment and the relationship between ideology and human experience.
  

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Review: Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society (updated with a new preface)

User Review  - Maitha - Goodreads

I liked it but the one thing that kept me hesitant throughout the book is that she wrote it without the Awlad Ali's permission. Read full review

Review: Veiled Sentiments: Honor and Poetry in a Bedouin Society (updated with a new preface)

User Review  - Michelle - Goodreads

Had to read this for one of my courses, and it was surprising good. Read full review

Contents

ONE Guest and Daughter i
1
TWO Identity in Relationship
39
THREE Honor and the Virtues of Autonomy
78
FOUR Modesty Gender and Sexuality
118
PART
167
six Honor and Poetic Vulnerability
186
SEVEN Modesty and the Poetry of Love
208
EIGHT Ideology and the Politics of Sentiment
233
Formulas and Themes
261
Notes
273
Bibliography
297
Index
309
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About the author (1999)

Lila Abu-Lughod is Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of Writing Women's Worlds: Bedouin Stories (California, 1993) and editor of Remaking Women: Feminism and Modernity in the Middle East (1998).

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