The Works of Alexander Pope, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. F. Dove, St. John's Square, 1822
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Contents

Customs of hospita
68
LETTERS TO AND FROM DR ATTERBURY
73
Advice
81
From the Same On a manuscript of Huetius
87
and love of books
100
From the Same More concerning men of quality
108
LETTER Page
111
The Authors last letter to the Bishop of Rochester
119
On the Death of his Daughter 128
128
Concerning painting Mr Gays poem of the Fan
135
From Mr Gay to Mr F on the remarkable death
142
t To the Same
150
A congratulation to Mr Gay on the end of
158
LETTER Page
161
To the Same On the death of Mr Gay
182
of friends A prospect of the Town upon
190
The Charitable Corpora tion More concerning Women
201
His idea of the Golden Age and unwilling ness to come to town
202
From the Same Desire to see Dr Swift Al teration in his passions and from whence
204
From Dr Swift to the Earl of Peterborow
206
Various opinions and some general reflections
207
To Mr C expostulatory on the hardships done an unhappy lady etc
210
To Mr Richardson
213
To the Same after Mrs Popes death 214
214
To the Same
215
tTo the Same
217
To Mr Bethel concerning the Essay on Man etc
218
To Mrs B Concern for the loss of friends 220
220
From Dr Arbuthnot in his last sickness His dying request to the Author
222
The Answer
223
t Mr Mallet to Lord Bolingbroke on Dr War burtons Edition of Pope in nine volumes
227
tMr Gay to Mr Pope On the Three Hours after Marriage
229
tTo Description of Blenheim 230
230
t Mr Pope to Lord Oxford 232
232
f To the Same
233
tTo the Same 234
234
tTo John Vandr Bempden Esq
235
t To Mr Jervas ibid LIX tTo Jabez Hughes Esq
237
tTo Mr Dennis
238

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Page 335 - tis justice, soon or late, Mercy alike to kill or save. Virtue unmov'd can hear the call, And face the flash that melts the ball.
Page 214 - I thank God, her death was as easy as her life was innocent ; and as it cost her not a groan, or even a sigh, there is yet upon her countenance such an expression of tranquillity, nay, almost of pleasure, that it is even amiable to behold it.
Page 33 - Walls of which all the objects of the River, Hills, Woods, and Boats, are forming a moving Picture in their visible Radiations: And when you have a mind to light it up, it affords you a very different Scene: it is finished with Shells interspersed with Pieces of Looking-glass in angular forms; and in the Ceiling is a Star of the same Material, at which when a Lamp (of an orbicular Figure of thin Alabaster) is hung in the Middle, a thousand pointed Rays glitter and are reflected over the Place.
Page 113 - His figure was beautiful ; but his manner was irresistible, by either man or woman. It was by this engaging, graceful manner, that he was enabled, during all his war, to connect the various and jarring powers of the Grand Alliance, and to carry them on to the main object of the war, notwithstanding their private and separate views, jealousies, and wrongheadednesses. Whatever court he went to (and he was often obliged to go himself to some resty and refractory ones), he as constantly prevailed, and...
Page 158 - HAVE many years ago magnified in my own mind, and repeated to you, a ninth Beatitude, added to the eighth in the Scripture ; " Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.
Page 153 - CONGREVE has merit of the highest kind ; he is an original writer, who borrowed neither the models of his plot nor the manner of his dialogue.
Page 124 - I look upon you as a spirit entered into another life ', as one just upon the edge of immortality ; where the passions and affections must be much more exalted, and where you ought to despise all little views, and all mean retrospects. Nothing is worth your looking back ; and therefore look forward, and make (as you can) the world look after you. But take care that it be not with pity, but with esteem and admiration. I am with the greatest sincerity, and passion for your fame as well as happiness,...
Page 278 - I know, would even marry Dennis for your sake, because he is your man, and loves his master. In short come down forthwith, or give me good reasons for delaying, though but for a day or two, by the next post. If I find them just, I will come up to you, though you...
Page 156 - As to any papers left behind him, I dare say they can be but few; for this reason, he never wrote out of vanity, or thought much of the applause of men.
Page 348 - THE more I examine my own mind, the more romantic I find myself. Methinks it is a noble spirit of contradiction to fate and fortune, not to give up those that are snatched from us, but follow them with warmer zeal, the farther they are removed from the sense of it.

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