Jamaica Kincaid: Where the Land Meets the Body

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University of Virginia Press, 1994 - Literary Criticism - 206 pages
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As a writer who has been quoted as saying she writes to save her life- that is she couldn't write, she would be a revolutionary- Antiguan novelist Jamaica Kincaid translates this passion into searing, exhilarating prose. Her weaving of history, autobiography, fiction, and polemic has won her a large readership. In this first book-length study of her work, Moira Ferguson examines all of Kincaid's writing up to 1992, focusing especially o their entwinement of personal and political identity. In doing so, she draws a parallel between the dynamics of the mother-daughter relationship in Kincaid's fiction and the more political relationship of the colonizer and the colonized. Ferguson calls this effect the "doubled mother"- a conception of motherhood as both colonial and biological.

  

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Contents

CHAPTER
7
CHAPTER 2
72
A New Site
107
CHAPTER 5
132
CONCLUSION
161
BIBLIOGRAPHY
189
INDEX
203
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Moira Ferguson is the James E. Ryan Chair in English and Women's Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her publications include Gender and Colonial Relations from Mary Wollstonecraft to Jamaica Kincaid: East Caribbean Connections; The Hart Sisters: Early African-Caribbean Writers, Evangelicals, and Radicals; and Subject to Others: British Women Writers and Colonial Slavery, 1670-1834.

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