One Eye, Two Eyes, Three Eyes: a Hutzul tale

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Holiday House, Sep 1, 1996 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 32 pages
1 Review
To honor her father's promise, a beautiful young girl agrees to become the slave of a witch and her two daughters, enduring their cruelty with the help of her talking pet goat.

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Review: One Eye, Two Eyes, Three Eyes: A Hutzul Tale

User Review  - Janet - Goodreads

I enjoyed this folktale as well as the illustrations--almost everyone of them had mushrooms depicted, usually very small ones on the forest floor. Also I liked the illustration of the witch, three ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3

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About the author (1996)

Eric Kimmel was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1946. He received a bachelor's degree in English Literature from Lafayette College. He also has a Ph.D. in Education from the University of Illinois. He was an elementary school teacher and college professor before becoming a full-time writer. He has published over fifty titles, many of which have won state and national awards. His titles "Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins" won the Caldecott Honor Medal, "The Chanukkah Guest" and "Gershon's Monster" won the Sydney Taylor Picture Book Award and "Anansi and the Talking Melon" won the Utah Children's Choice Award. Kimmel travels nationally and internationally visiting schools and talking about his books and telling stories.

Illustrator Dirk Zimmer was born in Goslar, Germany on October 2, 1943. He attended the Academy of Fine Arts in Hamburg. He worked as a painter during the German avant-garde movement and then went into filmmaking. In the late 1970s, he began working as an illustrator for numerous publications including Crawdaddy, the New York Times, and New York Magazine. He illustrated about 40 children's books between 1978 and 2008. He is best known for illustrating In a Dark, Dark Room and Other Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz, Bony-Legs by Joanna Cole, The One That Got Away by Percival Everett, and Seven Spiders Spinning by Gregory Maguire. He also wrote a book entitled Egon. He died on September 26, 2008 at the age of 64.

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