The True and the Beautiful in Nature, Art, Morals and Religion, Selected from the Works of John Ruskin (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Wiley & sons, 1889 - Aesthetics - 452 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 401 - And he took up his parable and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said...
Page 39 - Nature never did betray The heart that loved her ; 'tis her privilege, Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy : for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold...
Page 384 - My brethren have dealt deceitfully as a brook, and as the stream of brooks they pass away; Which are blackish by reason of the ice, and wherein the snow is hid: What time they wax warm, they vanish: when it is hot, they are consumed out of their place.
Page 21 - That which doth assign unto each thing the kind, that which doth moderate the force and power, that which doth appoint the form and measure, of working, the same we term a law.
Page 96 - For he is the Lord our God : and we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.
Page 411 - LET the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, " There is a man child conceived.
Page 142 - Therefore, when we build, let us think that we build forever. Let it not be for present delight, nor for present use alone ; let it be such work as our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time is to come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, ' ' See, this our fathers did for us.
Page 328 - Whilst summer lasts, and I live here, Fidele, I'll sweeten thy sad grave: Thou shalt not lack The flower, that's like thy face, pale primrose; nor The azur'd hare-bell, like thy veins; no, nor The leaf of eglantine, whom not to slander, Out-sweeten'd not thy breath...
Page 347 - Since he, so gray and stubborn now, Waved in each breeze a sapling bough ; Would he could tell how deep the shade A thousand mingled branches made ; How broad the shadows of the oak, How clung the rowan to the rock, And through the foliage showed his head, With narrow leaves, and berries red; What pines on every mountain sprung, O'er every dell what birches hung, In every breeze what aspens shook, What alders shaded every brook ! " Here, in my shade,
Page 312 - I look for ghosts ; but none will force Their way to me ; 'tis falsely said That there was ever intercourse Between the living and the dead ; For surely then I should have sight Of him I wait for day and night With love and longings infinite.

Bibliographic information