Advanced Quantum Mechanics

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World Scientific, Jan 1, 2007 - Science - 220 pages
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Renowned physicist and mathematician Freeman Dyson is famous for his work in quantum mechanics, nuclear weapons policy and bold visions for the future of humanity. In the 1940s, he was responsible for demonstrating the equivalence of the two formulations of quantum electrodynamics -- Richard Feynman's diagrammatic path integral formulation and the variational methods developed by Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonoga -- showing the mathematical consistency of QED. This invaluable volume comprises the legendary, never-before-published, lectures on quantum electrodynamics first given by Dyson at Cornell University in 1951. The late theorist Edwin Thompson Jaynes once remarked "For a generation of physicists they were the happy medium: clearer and motivated than Feynman, and getting to the point faster than Schwinger." Future generations of physicists are bound to read these lectures with pleasure, benefiting from the lucid style that is so characteristic of Dyson's exposition.
  

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I downloaded the free stuff on student-friendly QFT. It is way better.

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also available at:
http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0608140

Contents

Scattering Problems and Born Approximation
31
Field Theory
47
Examples of Quantized Field Theories
61
Free Particle Scattering Problems
125
General Theory of Free Particle Scattering
145
Scattering by a Static Potential Comparison with
183
Notes
205
Index
215
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About the author (2007)

Freeman Dyson spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force in World War 2. He graduated from Cambridge University in 1945 with a BA degree in mathematics. He went on to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman and went on to be appointed as a professor. His most useful contribution to science was the unification of the three versions of quantum electrodynamics invented by Feynman, Schwinger and Tomonaga. Dyson is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for progress in Religion. In addition to his scientific work, Professor Dyson has found time for raising five daughters, a son and a step-daughter.

David Derbes teaches physics at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and is a former professor at Tulane University. He is the recipient of a 2007 Golden Apple Award for excellence in teaching.

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