War Poetry of the South (Google eBook)

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William Gilmore Simms
Richardson, 1867 - American literature - 482 pages
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Page 249 - And cast him into the bottomless pit, and shut him up, and set a seal upon him, that he should deceive the nations no more, till the thousand years should be fulfilled : and after that he must be loosed a little season.
Page 316 - ... fragment of the earth! Thou Sun, that kindlest all thy gentlest rays Above it, as to light a favorite hearth! Ye Clouds, that in your temples in the West See nothing brighter than its humblest flowers! And you, ye Winds, that on the ocean's breast Are kissed to coolness ere ye reach its bowers! Bear witness with me in my song of praise, And tell the world that, since the world began, No fairer land hath fired a poet's lays, Or given a home to man!
Page 249 - AND HE LAID HOLD ON THE DRAGON, THAT OLD SERPENT, WHICH IS THE DEVIL AND SATAN AND BOUND HIM A THOUSAND YEARS. AND CAST HIM INTO THE BOTTOMLESS PIT AND SHUT HIM UP AND SET A SEAL UPON HIM, THAT HE SHOULD DECEIVE THE NATIONS NO MORE, TILL THE THOUSAND YEARS SHOULD BE FULFILLED: AND AFTER THAT HE MUST BE LOOSED A LITTLE SEASON.
Page 333 - Still there's a sense of blossoms yet unborn In the sweet airs of morn; One almost looks to see the very street Grow purple at his feet. At times a fragrant breeze comes floating by, And brings, you know not why, A feeling as when eager crowds await Before a palace gate Some wondrous pageant; and you scarce would start, If from a beech's heart, A blue-eyed Dryad, stepping forth, should say,
Page 390 - He's in the saddle now. Fall in, Steady the whole brigade ! Hill's at the ford, cut off; we'll win His way out, ball and blade. What matter if our shoes are worn ? What matter if our feet are torn? Quick step ! We're with him before morn > That's Stonewall Jackson's way.
Page 363 - Somebody wafted his name above, Night and morn on the wings of prayer. Somebody wept when he marched away, Looking so handsome, brave and grand; Somebody's kiss on his forehead lay, Somebody clung to his parting hand.
Page 333 - Ah ! who would couple thoughts of war and crime With such a blessed time ! Who in the west wind's aromatic breath Could hear the call of Death ! Yet not more surely shall the Spring awake The voice of wood and brake, Than she shall rouse, for all her tranquil charms, A million men to arms. There shall be deeper hues upon her plains Than all her sunlit rains, And every gladdening influence around, Can summon from the ground.
Page 92 - SOUTHRONS, hear your country call you! Up, lest worse than death befall you! . To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie! Lo! all the beacon-fires are lighted, Let all hearts be now united! To arms! To arms! To arms, in Dixie! Advance the flag of Dixie! Hurrah! hurrah! For Dixie's land we take our stand, And live or die for Dixie! To arms! To arms! And conquer peace for Dixie!
Page 468 - tis hard for us to fold it; Hard to think there's none to hold it; Hard that those who once unrolled it Now must furl it with a sigh.
Page 66 - Maryland! My Maryland! Dear Mother! burst the tyrant's chain, Maryland! Virginia should not call in vain, Maryland! She meets her sisters on the plain "Sic semper" 'tis the proud refrain That baffles minions back amain, Maryland!

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