The High School Pitcher

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1st World Publishing, 2006 - Literary Collections - 212 pages
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Clang! "Attention, please." The barely audible droning of study ceased promptly in the big assembly room of the Gridley High School. The new principal, who had just stepped into the room, and who now stood waiting behind his flat-top desk on the platform, was a tall, thin, severe-looking man of thirty-two or three. For this year Dr. Carl Thornton, beloved principal for a half-score of years, was not in command at the school. Ill health had forced the good old doctor to take at least a year's rest, and this stranger now sat in the Thornton chair. "Mr. Harper," almost rasped out Mr. Cantwell's voice, "stop rustling that paper."
  

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Contents

THE PRINCIPAL HEARS SOMETHING ABOUT PENNIES
9
DICK TAKES UP HIS PEN
27
MR CANTWELL THINKS TWICE OR OFTENER
34
DAVE WARNS TIP SCAMMON
46
RIPLEY LEARNS THAT THE PIPER MUST BE PAID
52
THE CALL TO THE DIAMOND FRED SCHEMES
59
DAVE TALKS WITH ONE HAND
69
HUH? WOOLLY CROCHETED SLIPPERS
77
TRYING OUT THE PITCHERS
103
THE RIOT CALL AND OTHER LITTLE THINGS
113
THE STEAM OF THE BATSMAN
123
A DASTARDS WORK IN THE DARK
130
THE HOUR OF TORMENTING DOUBT
137
WHEN THE HOME FANS QUIVERED
147
THE GRIT OF THE GRAND OLD GAME
152
SOME MEAN TRICKS LEFT OVER
165

FRED PITCHES A BOMBSHELL INTO TRAINING CAMP
83
DICK CO TAKE A TURN AT FEELING GLUM
90
THE THIRD PARTYS AMAZEMENT
96
DICK IS GENEROUS BECAUSE ITS NATURAL
179
THE AGONY OF THE LAST BIG GAME
196
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Harrie Irving Hancock (H. Irving Hancock) was born January 16, 1868 in Massachusetts. Hancock was a prolific writer, an American chemist, and a Jiu-Jitsu expert. He is mostly known for his juvenile "boys" series such as The Grammar School Boys/Dick & Co. Series, The High School Boys Series, The Young Engineer Series, and Uncle Sam's Boys Series, but was also well-known for his physical fitness writing which included several manuals on Jiu-Jitsu. Hancock was also a war correspondent, which lead to his historical fiction series on a German invasion of the United States. Hancock married Nellie Stein on December 21, 1887 and had two adopted daughters. Hancock died of liver illness in Blue Point, Suffolk County, New York on March 12, 1922.

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