Selected Poems of Gabriela Mistral

Front Cover
UNM Press, 2003 - Poetry - 407 pages
1 Review

The first Nobel Prize in literature to be awarded to a Latin American writer went to the Chilean poet Gabriela Mistral. Famous and beloved during her lifetime all over Latin America and in Europe, Mistral has never been known in North America as she deserves to be. The reputation of her more flamboyant and accessible friend and countryman Pablo Neruda has overshadowed hers, and she has been officially sentimentalized into a "poetess" of children and motherhood. Translations, and even selections of her work in Spanish, have tended to underplay the darkness, the strangeness, and the raging intensity of her poems of grief and pain, the yearning power of her evocations of the Chilean landscape, the stark music of her Round Dances, the visionary splendor of her Hymns of America.

During her lifetime Mistral published four books: Desolation, Tenderness, Clearcut, and Winepress. These are included in the "Complete" Nobel edition published in Madrid; the Poem of Chile, her last book, was printed years after her death. Le Guin includes poems from all five books in this volume, with particular emphasis on the later work. The intelligence and passion of Le Guin's selection and translation will finally allow people in the North to hear the originality, power, purity, and intransigence of this great American voice.

Le Guin has published five volumes of her own poetry, an English version of Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching, and a volume of mutual translation with the Argentine poet Diana Bellessi, The Twins, the Dream/Las Gemalas, El Sueño. Strongly drawn to Mistral's work as soon as she discovered it, Le Guin has been working on this translation for five years.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

awesome book, very good translation and explanations. totally worth using!

Review: Selected Poems (Latin American and Latino Art and Culture)

User Review  - Anthony - Goodreads

I fell in love with a translation of "She with a Missing Finger" when I stumbled upon it in the 1962 volume of the Hudson Review. I had to read more. Gabriela Mistral was a wonderful talent, underappreciated and undertranslated. Read full review

Contents

Muerte de mi madre
128
Gestos
134
Historias de Loca
144
Locas mujeres
226
Naturaleza II
268
Desvarío
282
Jugarretas II
290
Nocturnos
304
Hallazgo
330
Anochecer
336
Mancha de trébol
344
Cormoranes
350
BíoBío 357
357
Musgo
365
Cuatro tiempos del huemul
372
The Midnight 137
376

Religiosas
310
Tiempo
318
CLEARCUT 123
328
Regreso
381
A BRIEF CHRONOLGYOF M1STRALS UFE
405
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

Gabriela Mistral was the pseudonym of Lucila Godoy Alcayaga born in Chile in 1889. She is a Chilean poet, educator, diplomat, and feminist who was the first Latin American to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1945. In 1904 Mistral published some early poems, such as Ensoñaciones ("Dreams"), Carta Íntima ("Intimate Letter") and Junto al Mar, in the local newspaper El Coquimbo. An important moment of formal recognition came on December 22, 1914, when Mistral was awarded first prize in a national literary contest Juegos Florales in Santiago(the capital of Chile), with the work Sonetos de la Muerte (Sonnets of Death). In 1922 she published Desolación in New York, which further promoted her international acclaim. A year later she published Lecturas para Mujeres (Readings for Women), a text in prose and verse that celebrates Latin America from the Americanist perspective. The poet's second major volume of poetry, Tala, appeared in 1938, published in Buenos Aires with the help of longtime friend and correspondent Victoria Ocampo. This volume includes many poems celebrating the customs and folklore of Latin America. During the last years of her life she made her home in the town of Roslyn, New York; in early January 1957 she transferred to Hempstead, New York, where she died from pancreatic cancer on January 10, 1957, aged 67.

Arguably one of the canonical writers of American science fiction, Ursula K. Le Guin was born in Berkeley, Calif., in 1929, the daughter of Alfred L. and Theodora Kroeber. After earning an A.B. degree from Radcliffe College and an A.M. from Columbia University, Le Guin was awarded a Fulbright fellowship in 1953. The genre formerly classified as 'science fiction' has become divided into sub-genres, such as fantasy, realistic fiction, alternative history, and other categories. Le Guin resists classifying her own work in any one area, saying that some of it may be called 'science fiction', while other writings may be considered 'realist' and still others 'magical realism' (her term). Le Guin is one of the few writers whose works (which include poetry and short fiction) can be found in public libraries' collections for children, young adults, and adults. Le Guin's published works include a novel, A Wizard of Earthsea, that won an American Library Association Notable Book citation, a Horn Book Honor List citation, and the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1979. She has been nominated several times for the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award--the highest honors in science fiction/fantasy writing--and has won both awards. Her Earthsea Trilogy is a mainstay of libraries' fantasy fiction collections. Le Guin married Charles Alfred Le Guin on December 22, 1953. They live in Portland, Ore.

Bibliographic information