Game, by Hawkeye (Google eBook)

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Page 237 - One of their celebrated preachers, about the year 1216, represented, in one of his sermons, the pheasants, partridges, and ortolans as addressing themselves to the clergy, and entreating to be eaten by them, and them only, that, ' incorporated with their glorious bodies, they might be raised to heaven, and not go with impious devourers to the infernal regions.
Page 99 - ... spots and deep shadows, the effect of the sun's rays struggling to penetrate the leafy roof of Nature's aisle, deep in the solitude of the woods. See now the dappled herd, and watch the handsome buck as he roams here and there in the midst of his harem, or, browsing amongst the bushes, exhibits the graceful antlers to the lurking foe, who, by patient woodcraft, has succeeded in approaching his unsuspecting victim. Observe how proudly he holds himself as some other buck, of less pretensions, dares...
Page 13 - ... the eyes of the true sportsman. It is a pleasant sight to watch a herd of ibex when undisturbed, the kids frisking here and there on pinnacles or ledges of rocks and beetling cliffs, where there seems scarcely safe foothold for anything much larger than a grass-hopper or a fly ; the old mothers looking calmly on, or grazing steadily, while the day is young, cropping the soft moss or tender herbs, and sweet short grass, springing from the crevices of the craggy precipices in richabundance.
Page 99 - Imagine a forest glade, the graceful bamboo arching overhead, forming a lovely vista, with here and there bright spots and deep shadows the effect of the sun's rays struggling to penetrate the leafy roof of nature's aisle. Deep in the solitude of the woods see now the dappled herd, and watch the handsome buck, as he roams here and there in the midst of his harem, or, browsing amongst the bushes, exhibits his graceful antlers to the lurking foe, who, by patient woodcraft, has succeeded in approaching...
Page 14 - Her post as sentinel is generally a prominent one, on the edge and corner perhaps of some ledge, to be well sheltered from the wind and warmed by the sun, along which the rest of the herd dispose themselves as inclined, fully trusting in the watchful guardian, whose manoeuvres I have been describing. Should the sentinel be joined by another, or her kid come and lie down by her, they invariably place themselves back to back, or in such a manner that they can keep a look-out on either side. A solitary...
Page 257 - ... follow a bird of prey, I cannot say. Evidently his cry is different from what it is at other times, which indicates danger being near, particularly as whenever that cry is heard the voice of no other jackal is, nor is that particular call ever heard in any part of the country where there are not large beasts of prey.
Page 14 - ... enjoyment of their nomadic life and its romantic haunts. Usually, before reposing, one of the herd, generally an old doe, may be observed intently gazing below, apparently scanning every spot in the range of her vision, sometimes for half an hour or more before she is satisfied that " all is well ;" strange to say, seldom or never looking up to the rocks above. Then, being satisfied on the one side, she observes the same process on the other, eventually calmly lying down, contented with the precautions...
Page 54 - ... We cannot give him the credit of the intellect of man, who, in pursuit of game, is well aware nothing can be done down wind. Were it so, not a Sambur or Deer would be left alive. The Tiger would bag them all just as he pleased, in fact, he would then be able to kill any Deer when he wanted it. We have so far considered the acuteness on the part of the game to ensure them against total destruction, and I have only one further observation to record, and that is how often the presence of a Tiger...
Page 14 - Then, again, to see the caution observed in taking up their resting or abiding places for the day, where they may be warmed by the sun, listening to the roar of many waters, and figuratively, we may say, chewing the cud of contentment, and giving themselves up to the full enjoyment of their nomadic life and its romantic haunts. Usually before reposing one of the herd, generally an old doe, may be observed intently gazing below, apparently scanning every spot in the range of her vision, sometimes...
Page 60 - PREY. 133 fought, deponent sayeth not ; but though strange it is not uncommon either with the hairy or the feathered tribes birds of prey doing the same, for I shot a falcon in the act of feeding on a kestrel it had struck down. Another instance is known of a tiger having killed a young tiger over a dead bullock, and partly eaten him. There is a peculiar and singular distinction in regard to the mode of breaking up their prey between the tiger and the panther, the former invariably commencing...

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