The Enemy of God

Front Cover
Wheeler Pub., Feb 1, 2006 - Fiction - 592 pages
5 Reviews
Gabe Driscoll, chief of Internal Affairs for the New York City police department, stands in the city morgue, watching an autopsy. His interest is more than professional. The body is that of activist priest Frank Redmond, who along with Driscoll belonged to a championship swim relay team at a Jesuit high school in the 1950s.
More than three decades later, Redmond has gone off a Harlem rooftop a few blocks from his church, and the surviving members of the team--Driscoll and Pulitzer Prize--winning journalist Andrew Troy-find themselves reunited in a bizarre new race to figure out how and why Redmond died. Was it suicide, as police and diocesan investigations have summarily concluded? Or was he pushed-murdered-and if so, by whom? The search for answers takes them to Vietnam and Africa and back to Harlem, and inside their own ambitions, passions, and secrets, both past and present.
ROBERT DALEY is the author of sixteen novels, including Year of the Dragon, and eleven nonfiction books, including Prince of the City. Born and educated in New York City, he served one year as an NYPD deputy commissioner. Daley lives in Connecticut and Nice, France."

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Review: The Enemy of God

User Review  - Kenneth Nordqvist - Goodreads

I have always liked to read Robert Daley books Read full review

Review: The Enemy of God

User Review  - Gillian - Goodreads

about a priest in Harlem & why he dies Read full review

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
7
Section 3
24
Copyright

39 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

New York Times bestselling author Robert Daley is a native New Yorker who has written more than twenty books. His numerous experiences have found there way into his writing. He served in the Air Force, worked as publicity director for the New York Giants football team, spent six years as a European sports correspondent for The New York Times, and became the NYPD deputy police commissioner in charge of public affairs from 1971-1972. Since then, he has become a full-time writer. He and his French-born wife keep homes in Connecticut and Nice.

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