Flashman and the Redskins

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Penguin Group, 1982 - Fiction - 480 pages
20 Reviews
If the American West was a place for heroes, what then was Harry Flashman doing there? Among other things, he was fleeing a murder charge...traveling with a brothel on wheels toward the Californian goldfields...betraying the scarlet woman who loved him...tricking the noble redmen while seducing their women...studiously ignoring all calls of duty and honor as the dealth with the likes of Wild Bill Hickok, Geronimo, Kit Carson, Crazy Horse, and George Custer...and reaching his moment of supreme inglory and fear under fire at the Battle of Little Big Horn. Yes, Flashman was back in the thick of things, making the kind of history you willl never learn in school.

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Review: Flashman and the Redskins (Flashman Papers #7)

User Review  - Steven - Goodreads

While this is seventh within the series chronology, it is second to none in terms of sheer readability, fast-paced action, and fascinating detail. The first half picks up where Flash for Freedom! left ... Read full review

Review: Flashman and the Redskins (Flashman Papers #7)

User Review  - Joe V - Goodreads

The Flashman books are unabashed politically incorrect, often hilarious, remarkably accurate historical novels set in the 19th Century. Our hero Harry Flashman, an officer in the British military ... Read full review

Contents

II
11
III
13
IV
15
Copyright

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William G. Lycan
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About the author (1982)

Author George MacDonald Fraser was born April 2, 1925 in Carlisle. He was refused entrance to the medical faculty of Glasgow University, so he joined the army in 1943. He served as an infantryman with the 17th Indian Division of the XIVth Army in Burma, a lance corporal and was commissioned in the Gordon Highlanders. After the war, he became a sports reporter with the Carlisle Journal; and during this time, he met and married Kathleen Hetherington, a reporter from another paper. He worked as a reporter and sub-editor on the Cumberland News and then moved to Glasgow, in 1953, where he worked at the Glasgow Herald as a features editor and deputy editor. Fraser's first novel was "Flashman" (1969), which was followed by nine sequels, so far, that deal with different venues of the 19th century ranging from Russia, Borneo and China to the Great Plains of the America West. Some of the other titles in the Flashman Papers are "Royal Flash" (1970), "Flashman in the Great Game" (1975), "Flashman and the Redskins" (1982), and "Flashman and the Angel of the Lord" (1994). Some of his non-fiction work includes "The Steel Bonnets" (1971), which is a factual study of the Anglo-Scottish border thieves in the seventeenth century, and "Quartered Safe Out Here" (1992). Fraser has also written a number of screenplays that include "The Three Musketeers" (1973), "Royal Flash" (1975), "Octopussy" (1983), and "Return of the Musketeers" (1989). He has also written a series of short stories about Private McAuslan whose titles include "The General Danced at Dawn" (1970), "McAuslan in the Rough" (1974), and "The Sheik and the Dustbin and other McAuslan Stories" (1988). He died of cancer on January 2, 2008.

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