Memoirs of the life of colonel Hutchinson, publ. by J. Hutchinson. To which is prefixed The life of mrs. Hutchinson, written by herself (Google eBook)

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1808
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Page 4 - ... in all his motions ; he was apt for any bodily exercise, and any that he did became him ; he could dance admirably well, but neither in youth nor riper...
Page 307 - God, and in conferences with conscientious, upright, unbiassed persons, proceeded to sign the sentence against the king. Although he did not then believe but it might one day come to be again disputed among men, yet both he and others thought they could not refuse it without giving up the people of God, whom they had led forth and engaged themselves unto by the oath of God, into the hands of God's and their enemies...
Page 272 - Finally, Mrs. Hutchinson is confined. Then the governor "invited all the ministers to dinner, and propounded his doubt and the ground thereof to them. None of them could defend their practice with any satisfactory reason, but the tradition of the Church from the primitive times, and their main buckler of federal holiness, which Tombs and Denne had excellently overthrown. He and his wife then, professing themselves unsatisfied, desired their opinions.
Page 76 - Nescia mens hominum fati sortisque futurae et servare modum, rebus sublata secundis ! Turno tempus erit, magno cum optaverit emptum intactum Pallanta et cum spolia ista diemque oderit.
Page 43 - This soone past into a mutuall friendship betweene them, and though she innocently thought nothing of love, yet was she glad to have acquir'd such a friend, who had wisedome and vertue enough to be trusted with her councells.
Page xxxii - Tower, and addicting themselves to chimistrie, she suffer'd them to make their rare experiments at her cost, partly to comfort and divert the poore prisoners, and partly to gaine the knowledge of their experiments, and the medicines to helpe such poore people as were not able to seeke to phisitians.
Page 185 - Then were again seen in the streets faces which called up strange and terrible recollections of the days when the saints, with the high praises of God in their mouths, and a two-edged sword in their hands, had bound kings with chains, and nobles with links of iron. Then were again heard voices which had shouted, " Privilege
Page 341 - The cavaliers, seeing their victors thus beyond their hopes falling into their hands, had not patience to stay till things ripened of themselves, but were every day forming designs and plotting for the murder of Cromwell, and other insurrections, which being contrived in drink and managed by false and cowardly fellows, were still revealed to Cromwell, who had most excellent intelligence of all things that passed, even...
Page 262 - And thus being well armed within by the satisfaction of their own consciences, and without, by good iron arms, they would as one man stand firmly and charge desperately.
Page 329 - ... erected for himself a more glorious monument in the hearts of good men, by his affection to his country, his abilities of mind, his impartial justice, his diligence in the public service, and his other virtues ; which were a far greater honour to his memory, than a dormitory amongst the ashes of kings...

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