On the Principles of Political Economy, and Taxation (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Murray, 1821 - Economics - 538 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
53
III
76
IV
80
V
86
VI
107
VII
131
VIII
162
XVII
281
XVIII
300
XIX
307
XX
320
XXI
338
XXII
354
XXIII
380
XXIV
388

IX
169
X
191
XI
195
XII
201
XIII
214
XIV
226
XV
231
XVI
245
XXV
403
XXVI
415
XXVII
421
XXVIII
448
XXIX
457
XXX
460
XXXI
466
XXXII
483

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 346 - What is prudence in the conduct of every private family, can scarce be folly in that of a great kingdom. If a foreign country can supply us with a commodity cheaper than we ourselves can make it, better buy it of them with some part of the produce of our own industry, employed in a way in which we have some advantage.
Page 95 - The friends of humanity cannot but wish that in all countries the labouring classes should have a taste for comforts and enjoyments, and that they should be stimulated by all legal means in their exertions to procure them. There cannot be a better security against a superabundant population.
Page 202 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain, and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Page 143 - Gold and silver having been chosen for the general medium of circulation, they are, by the competition of commerce, distributed in such proportions amongst the different countries of the world, as to accommodate themselves to the natural traffic which would take place if no such metals existed, and the trade between countries were purely a trade of barter.
Page 86 - The natural price of labour is that price which is necessary to enable the labourers, one with another, to subsist and to perpetuate their race, without either increase or diminution.
Page 460 - The chapter opens by reaffirming that it is the cost of production which must ultimately regulate the price of commodities, and not, as has been often said, the proportion between the supply and demand: the proportion between supply and demand may, indeed, for a time, affect the market value of a commodity, until it is supplied in greater or less abundance, according as the demand may have increased or diminished, but this effect will be only of temporary duration.
Page 419 - The capital employed in purchasing foreign goods for home consumption, when this purchase is made with the produce of domestic industry, replaces too, by every such operation, two distinct capitals; but one of them only is employed in supporting domestic industry.
Page 1 - The things which have the greatest value in use have frequently little or no value in exchange; and, on the contrary, those which have the greatest value in exchange have frequently little or no value in use.
Page 327 - Capital is that part of the wealth of a country which is employed in production, and consists of food, clothing, tools, raw materials, machinery, etc., necessary to give effect to labour.
Page 3 - The real price of everything, what everything really costs to the man who wants to acquire it, is the toil and trouble of acquiring it.

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