Platero y yo

Front Cover
EDAF, 1984 - Fiction - 109 pages
2 Reviews
Juan Ramón Jiménez, Premio Nobel de 1956, convirtió su Platero - el borriquillo que paseaba al poeta en las tardes de Moguer - en una figura popular.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hbergander - LibraryThing

This book should be compulsory reading in Catalonia. For to learn, what contemplation in the best Mediterranean sense means and is good for. And the book teaches more: A certain generosity, which, a ... Read full review

Review: Platero y yo

User Review  - Yago de Artaza Paramo - Goodreads

I read it when I was a teenager and recently read it again. These are the stories that create a good base for good ethics as an adult. Read full review

Contents

Prologuillo
13
Platero
15
Paisaje grana
17
Alegría 18 III
18
Mariposas blancas
19
La Primavera
20
Angelus
22
El loco
23
Carnaval
60
El pozo
63
Nocturno
65
El niño tonto
66
Domingo
67
La carretilla
68
Retorno
70
El pastor
71

La flor del camino
25
Ronsard
26
La luna
28
El canario vuela
29
Susto
30
La púa
32
luegos del anochecer
33
Amistad
35
La novia
36
Escalofrío
38
Ella y nosotros
40
La coz
41
Asnografia
43
El verano
44
Darbón
45
La arrulladora
46
El canto del grillo
47
Corpus
49
La cuadra
52
El perro sarnoso
53
Tormenta
54
Pasan los patos
56
Última siesta
57
La tísica
58
Paseo
59
Convalecencia
73
La niña chica
74
El Otoño
77
Sarito
78
Tarde de octubre
79
El loro
80
Anochecer 8 2
82
El Rocío
84
Gorriones
87
Idilio de noviembre
89
El canario se muere
90
Los ruegos
92
LUI El racimo olvidado
94
Noche pura
96
El alba
98
Navidad
99
El invierno
101
Idilio de abril
102
Libertad
103
La muerte
105
Nostalgia
106
El borriquete
107
Melancolía
108
A Platero en el cielo de Moguer
110
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

On receiving the Nobel Prize in 1956, Juan Ramon Jimenez was praised for "his lyrical poetry, which constitutes an inspiring example in the Spanish language of spirituality and artistic purity." Jimenez's works have indeed provided inspiration for many younger Spanish poets--- Federico Garcia Lorca, Pedro Salinas, and Jorge Guillen among them---as well as for Latin American poets. His poetic world is both aesthetic and spiritual. Through poetry Jimenez endeavored not only to express his interior reality but also to reach the highest levels of spiritual experience. Jimenez's early work is marked by a short period of modernism followed by a rejection of it in favor of simpler forms, particularly that of traditional Spanish ballads. The turmoil and anxiety produced by his sea voyage to the United States to marry an American, Zenobia Camprubi, and their return as newlyweds began his second period. That phase was characterized by increasing subjectivity and purification of his poetry, a process furthered by Zenobia, who protected him from intrusions of the world. His use of women to symbolize the objects of his desires to know and experience reveals the influence of Gustavo Adolfo Becquer. In his final stage, he embarked on a mystical search for the absolute. His revelation was that "God desired" and "God desiring" reside within his own soul. Platero and I (1914), a poignant and charming story in poetic prose about a silver-gray donkey named Platero, is popular with children. Jimenez did not intend it for children exclusively, however, but rather as a celebration of the essence of the child, "a spiritual island fallen from heaven.