Economic Expansion in the Byzantine Empire, 900-1200

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 30, 2003 - Business & Economics - 320 pages
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In this book Dr. Harvey shows that if we broaden our comprehension of feudalism, the economic developments of the Byzantine empire and the medieval West were far more comparable than Byzantine historians have been prepared to admit. Previous interpretations have linked economic trends too closely to the political fortunes of the state, and have consequently regarded the twelfth century as a period of economic stagnation. Yet there is considerable evidence that during this period, the empire's population expanded, agricultural production intensified, coinage in circulation increased, and towns revived. Dr. Harvey's conclusions will affect all future interpretations of the general course of Byzantine history. and call for a reassessment of the whole nature and social structure of the Byzantine economy.
  

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Contents

I
vii
II
viii
III
xiii
IV
1
V
14
VI
35
VII
80
VIII
120
IX
163
X
198
XI
244
XII
269
XIII
293
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Page 289 - La Romanie vénitienne au Moyen Âge. Le développement et l'exploitation du domaine colonial vénitien (xif-xv* siècles), Paris, 1959.

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Alan Harvey produces the popular podcast "Demand Side Economics" available on iTunes (choose "demandside"). He is a writer and economist living in Seattle, Washington.

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