Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley, 1883 - Battles - 407 pages
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Review: The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

User Review  - Dmclayton5 - Goodreads

While the language is masterful and articulate and the accounts of the battles very thorough, English imperialist bias seeps through the good qualities of this piece of history. Other than this major ... Read full review

Review: The Fifteen Decisive Battles of the World: From Marathon to Waterloo

User Review  - Parikshit Lale - Goodreads

Creasy does a great job in creating a string of 15 landmarks that got western europe to 18th century. The title might well been fifteen decisive battles of west ! Apart from that . an obvious ... Read full review

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Page 215 - MY loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people. Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and goodwill of my subjects...
Page 324 - twas but the wind, Or the car rattling o'er the stony street; On with the dance! let joy be unconfined; No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet But hark!
Page 325 - And Ardennes waves above them her green leaves, Dewy with nature's tear-drops as they pass, Grieving, if aught inanimate e'er grieves, Over the unreturning brave, - alas! Ere evening to be trodden like the grass...
Page 325 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war; And the deep thunder peal on peal afar; And near, the beat of the alarming drum Roused up the soldier ere the morning star; While throng'd the citizens with terror dumb, Or whispering, with white lips — »The foe! They come! they come!« And wild and high the 'Cameron's gathering...
Page 324 - No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the glowing Hours with flying feet— But hark!— that heavy sound breaks in once more, As if the clouds its echo would repeat; And nearer, clearer, deadlier than> before! Arm! Arm! it is— it is— the cannon's opening roar!
Page 215 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman ; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm ! To which, rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, — I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.
Page 296 - This article is inadmissible in every extremity ; sooner than this army will consent to ground their arms in their encampment, they will rush on the enemy, determined to take no quarter.
Page 324 - To chase the glowing hours with flying feet. But hark that heavy sound breaks in once more, As if the clouds its echo would repeat And nearer, clearer, deadlier than before ! Arm! arm! it is — it is the cannon's opening roar! Within a windowed niche of that high hall Sate Brunswick's fated chieftain: he did hear That sound the first amidst the festival, And caught its tone with death's prophetic ear...
Page 104 - Then leave the poor Plebeian his single tie to life — The sweet, sweet love of daughter, of sister, and of wife, The gentle speech, the balm for all that his vexed soul endures, The kiss, in which he half forgets even such a yoke as yours. Still let the maiden's beauty swell the father's breast with pride ; Still let the bridegroom's arms enfold an unpolluted bride.
Page 227 - England, been lost in the year 1588, if he had not been better advised, than a great many malignant fools were that found fault with his demeanour. The Spaniards had an army aboard them, and he had none; they had more ships than he had, and of higher building and charging; so that, had he entangled himself with those great and powerful vessels, he had greatly endangered this kingdom of England.

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