The Army Air Forces in World War II, Volume Six: Men and Planes (Google eBook)

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing
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Contents

I
3
III
28
IV
78
V
119
VI
171
VIII
193
IX
228
X
263
XVIII
454
XIX
488
XX
527
XXI
557
XXIII
600
XXV
629
XXVI
674
XXVII
703

XII
299
XIV
331
XV
362
XVI
398
XVII
427

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Popular passages

Page 438 - Academy, the United States Naval Academy, and the United States Coast Guard Academy, have adopted a course of study for their students complying with the rules prescribed by the...
Page 236 - The order specified that the committee shall correlate and support scientific research on the mechanisms and devices of warfare, except those relating to problems of flight included in the field of activities of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Page 753 - ... adopted by the Free French. The battery of 20 psychological tests used for classifying all candidates for pilot, navigator, bombardier, and aerial gunnery training have proved valid in predicting not only an aviation cadet's chance for winning his wings but also the flier's chance for combat success. In a follow-up study of both bomber and fighter pilots in the European theater, it was determined that pilots who had scored highest in the psychological tests administered before they learned to...
Page 705 - Henry L. Stimson and McGeorge Bundy, On Active Service in Peace and War (New York, 1947), 632-33.
Page 463 - The Secretary of War is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to detail not to exceed 2 per centum of the commissioned officers of the Regular Army in any fiscal year as students at such technical, professional, and other educational institutions, or as...
Page 23 - ... to develop an organization staffed and equipped to provide the ground forces with essential aircraft units for joint operations, while at the same time expanding and decentralizing our staff work to permit Air Force autonomy in the degree needed.
Page 407 - ... units would have a prior claim on American planes, but would be committed to action as soon as possible. He described the situation to the Prime Minister in the following words: Today it is evident that under current arrangements the US is going to have increasing trained air personnel in excess of combat planes in sight for them to use. We are therefore anxious that every appropriate American-made aircraft be manned and fought by our own crews.
Page 556 - Psychology program has paid off in time, lives, and money saved, and through its selection of the raw material has aided in the establishment of an effective combat air force. This has been done at a total cost of less than $5 per candidate tested.
Page 278 - We must not only provide munitions for our own fighting forces," Roosevelt advised Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, "but vast quantities to be used against the enemy in every appropriate theater of war.
Page 485 - ... ground crews, establishing supply depots and supply lines, strengthening our continental defenses, expanding our aircraft and engine factories, furnishing friendly nations with more planes and equipment than we could spare, and getting ready for war. When the Japanese attacked on...

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