The Forms of Action at Common Law: A Course of Lectures

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 3, 1936 - Law - 88 pages
3 Reviews
The forms of action are a part of the structure upon which rests the whole common law of England and, though we may have buried them, they still, as Maitland says, rule us from their graves. The following extract is taken from the editors' preface: 'The evasion of the burden of archaic procedure and of such barbaric tests of truth as battle, ordeal and wager of law, by the development of new forms and new law out of criminal or quasi criminal procedure and the inquest of neighbour-witnesses has never been described with this truth and clearness. He makes plain a great chapter of legal history which the learners and even the lawyers of today have almost abandoned in despair. The text of the chief writs is given after the lectures ...'
  

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Review: The Forms of Action at Common Law: A Course of Lectures

User Review  - Ke Huang - Goodreads

Since I read this book on my commute from home to law school, I didn't get to consult the dictionary for words I didn't know. Also, I am not really an English history buff. Still, I found this book comprehensive and clear. Read full review

Review: The Forms of Action at Common Law

User Review  - Sparrowfall - Goodreads

The author writes with such self-evident authority and such a classic style that even if tomorrow his research was refuted I would still want to believe every word. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
10
III
16
IV
33
V
43
VI
53
VII
59
VIII
67
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About the author (1936)

Frederic William Maitland (1850-1906): late Downing Professor of the Laws of England in the University of Cambridge, arguably the greatest of all British historians, and a major voice in political theory.

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