Electrochemical Engineering: Science and Technology in Chemical and Other Industries

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 18, 1999 - Science - 404 pages
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Electrochemical Engineering sounds very much like chemical engineering, but the chemists, electro chemists, material scientists and whoever else comes into touch with technical electrochemical systems very soon gets the feeling, that chemical engineering wisdom will not get them very far in enhancing their un derstanding and helping them to solve their problems with technical electro chemical devices. Indeed not only the appearance of but also the physics and physical chemistry in electrochemical reactors - electrolyzers, batteries or fuel cells and others - are quite different from that of normal chemical reactors. Next to interfacial charge transfer and current density distributions is the relatively high importance of mass transfer and its hindrance in liquid electrolytes which distinguishes electrolyzers from chemical reactors. Therefore electrochemical engineering science became a science branch which at first developed with little reference to chemical engineering treating the relevant topics on a high mathe maticallevel. This has led to a certain perfection, which today - in principl- allows us to model almost any desired electrolyzer or cell configuration with nu merical methods to a degree and precision which satisfies the highest demands. This is classical chemical engineering stuff, which, however, neglects the chem ical side of electrochemical technology.
  

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Contents

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About the author (1999)

Gerhard Kreysa, born 1945, studied chemistry at the Technical University of Dresden. After obtaining his doctorate, he joined the Karl Winnacker Institute of the DECHEMA in Frankfurt (Main) where he focused his research interests on electrochemical engineering and environmental protection. He became Chief Executive of the DECHEMA in 1992. In the course of his career, Professor Kreysa has received several national and international scientific awards, and honorary doctorates from the University of Clausthal and the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. He is a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, teaches at the universities of Dortmund and Regensburg and holds numerous honorary positions. He is also actively involved in issues pertaining to research and the public acceptance of science and technology.
Michael SchA1/4tze, born 1952, studied materials sciences at the University of Erlangen-NA1/4rnberg from 1972 to 1978, then joined the Karl Winnacker Institute of the DECHEMA as a research associate. He received his doctorate in engineering sciences from the RWTH (Technical University) in Aachen in 1983, completed his habilitation in 1991, becoming a member of the external teaching staff of the RWTH. Since 1998, he holds a professorship there. In 1996, he was appointed director of the Karl Winnacker Institute. He is recipient of the Friedrich-Wilhelm-Prize and the Rahmel-Schwenk medal, past Chairman of the Gordon Research Conference on Corrosion, editor of the journal Materials and Corrosion and Chairman of the European Federation Working Party Corrosion by Hot Gases and Combustion Products.

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