Biology and Its Makers (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1910 - Biology - 469 pages
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Page 425 - I happened to read for amusement ' Malthus on Population,' and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of new species. Here then I had at last got a theory by which to work...
Page 387 - I may be permitted to remark that in the first edition of this work, and subsequently, I placed in a most conspicuous position namely, at the close of the Introduction the following words : " I am convinced that natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification.
Page 419 - Wallace's consent to allow the essay to be published as soon as possible. Of this step we highly approved, provided Mr. Darwin did not withhold from the public, as he was strongly inclined to do (in favour of Mr. Wallace) the memoir which he had himself written on the same subject, and which, as before stated, one of us had perused in 1844, and the contents of which we had both of us been privy to for many years. On representing this to Mr. Darwin, he gave us permission to make what use we thought...
Page 198 - Then, as touching the kind of work done by these two men, the more I think of it I find this conclusion more impressed upon me, that the greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something, and tell what it saw in a plain way.
Page 249 - The elementary parts of all tissues are formed of cells in an analogous, though very diversified manner, so that it may be asserted, that there is one universal principle of development for the elementary parts of organisms, however different, and that this principle is the formation of cells.
Page 387 - But as my conclusions have lately been much misrepresented, and it has been stated that I attribute the modification of species exclusively to natural selection, I may be permitted to remark that in the first edition of this work, and subsequently, I placed in a most conspicuous position namely, at the close of the Introduction the following words : " I am convinced that natural selection has been the main but not the exclusive means of modification.
Page 420 - ... the Linnean Society, we have explained to him that we are not solely considering the relative claims to priority of himself and his friend, but the interests of science generally; for we feel it to be desirable that views founded on a wide deduction from facts, and matured by years of reflection, should constitute at once a goal from which others may start, and that, while the scientific world is waiting for the appearance of Mr. Darwin's complete work, some of the leading results of his labours,...
Page 45 - Harvey was not tall, but of the lowest stature; round faced, with a complexion like the wainscot; his eyes small, round, very black, and full of spirit; his hair black as a raven, but quite white twenty years before he died ; rapid in his utterance, choleric, given to gesture,
Page 420 - ... and the contents of which we had both of us been privy to for many years. On representing this to Mr. Darwin, he gave us permission to make what use we thought proper of his memoir, &c. ; and in adopting our present course, of presenting it to the Linnean Society, we have explained to him that we are not solely considering the relative claims to priority of himself and his friend, but the interests of science generally...
Page 105 - I could not perceive, even in very clear water, to be mov'd by them. These little creatures, if they chanced to light upon the least filament or string, or other such particle...

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