Of the Origin and Progress of Language.. (Google eBook)

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J. Balfour, Edinburgh; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, London., 1792 - Language and languages
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Page 468 - Mansfield formed a chafte and correct ftile of fpeaking, fuitable to bufinefs, and particularly the bufmefs of a judge ; to whofe office it belongs, not only to determine controverfies betwixt man and man, but to fatisfy the parties that they have got juftice, and thereby give cafe and contentment to their minds, which I hold to be one of the great ufes of law. In this my Lord Mansfield, as it is well known, was fo fuccefsful, that even the lofing party commonly acknowledged the juftice of his decrees:...
Page 186 - Lucum ligna : cave ne portus occupet alter, Ne Cibyratica, ne Bithyna negotia perdas ; Mille talenta rotundentur, totidem altera, porro et Tertia succedant, et quae pars quadret acervum. 35 Scilicet uxorem cum dote fidemque et amicos Et genus et formam regina Pecunia donat, Ac bene nummatum decorat Suadela Venusque. Mancipiis locuples eget aeris Cappadocum rex : Ne fueris hic tu. Chlamydes Lucullus, ut aiunt, 40 Si posset centum scenae praebere rogatus, Qui possum tot...
Page 125 - ... either of thefe, give a turn and form to the thought and expreffion, different from what is ufual in common fpeech. Under one or other of thefe heads may be ranked, as I imagine, every figure of this kind that can be devifed f.
Page 221 - LEST as th' immortal gods is he, The youth who fondly fits by thee, And hears and fees thee all the while Softly fpeak and fweetly fmile...
Page 417 - Demofthenes, who has much more variety in this, and in every other refpect, than Ifocrates. It, may however, be obferved, as an apology for Ifocrates and the Latin writers, that, by terminating the fentence with the governing verb, the beginning and the end are often connected together, by which the fenfe of the whole is brought altogether to the mind of the reader or hearer. But though it often ferve this purpofe, it ought not to be conftantly ufed, otherwife it gives a tedious uniformity to the...
Page 393 - Defcriptas fcrvare vices, operumque colores *, and could fuit his ftile to his fubject, than which nothing fhews more judgment and tafte in a writer. And here we may obferve in paffing^ that thefe orations are a proof, among many others which might be produced, that the artificial arrangement of words which we obferve in the Greek orators and other elegant writers, was not the common language of the people of Athens, of which the two orations above mentioned were undoubtedly an exact imitation.
Page 144 - ... continued to fing, and, as it was very natural, joined their mufical tones to their articulate founds, and fo formed a mufical language, and at the fame time fupplyed the defects of their very fcanty articulation.
Page 417 - ... tedious uniformity to the compofition, which to me is offenfive. And yet this is the cafe of almoft all the compofition in Latin, both oratorial and hiftorical. Of the practice of it in their hiftorical ftile, I have fpoken in the paflage above quoted from vol. 4th of this work. And as to the oratorial, we have but to read one oration of Cicero, to be convinced that he ufes it much too frequently ; and from a paflage in the end of his Orator, he very plainly tells us, that the compofition is...
Page 443 - ... but joined together *, fuch as I am perfuaded would not have been endured in Athens, not even by the boys there, though it is likely that in Rome he was admired for them, and clapped in the manner that we applaud our players. And there is in his oration for Milo, (one of the moft laboured, I believe, he ever wrote) a...
Page 448 - ... upon Demofthenes, as I have obferved *, they are, in many places, mutilated and imperfect. But there is one ufe the Greek fcholar may "make, even of the...

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