The Theatrical City: Culture, Theatre and Politics in London, 1576-1649

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David L. Smith, Richard Strier, David Bevington
Cambridge University Press, Dec 18, 2003 - History - 308 pages
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This collection of essays adopts a novel, interdisciplinary approach to a diverse group of texts composed in London during the Renaissance. Eight literary scholars and eight historians from two continents have been paired to write companion essays on each text. This original method opens up rich insights into London's social, political, and cultural life which would have eluded members of either discipline working in isolation. 'Theatrical' is taken to be a very flexible term, and is applied to the civic rituals and public spectacles of the capital (for example, the execution of King Charles I) as well as to the elite and popular theatre. The eight texts therefore include historical accounts, political documents and polemical works as well as plays.
  

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Contents

V
17
VI
35
VII
55
VIII
68
IX
87
X
101
XI
117
XII
137
XIV
170
XV
183
XVI
193
XVII
209
XVIII
224
XIX
245
XX
260
XXI
282

XIII
157

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About the author (2003)

David L. Smith is Fellow, Director of Studies in History and Graduate Tutor at Selwyn College, Cambridge. His previous publications include Parliaments and Politics During the Cromwellian Protectorate (as co-author, Cambridge University Press, 2007) and Royalists and Royalism During the Interregnum (as co-editor, 2010).

Richard Strier is the Frank L. Sulzberger Distinguished Service Professor in
the Department of English and in the College at the University of Chicago. He has coedited several interdisciplinary essay collections and is the author of many articles and two books, "Resistant Structures: Particularity, Radicalism, and Renaissance Texts", and "Love Known: Theology and Experience in George Herbert's Poetry", the latter published by the University of Chicago Press.

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