Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 2008 - Medical - 425 pages
24 Reviews

Revised and Expanded

With the same trademark compassion and erudition he brought to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Oliver Sacks explores the place music occupies in the brain and how it affects the human condition. In Musicophilia, he shows us a variety of what he calls “musical misalignments.” Among them: a man struck by lightning who suddenly desires to become a pianist at the age of forty-two; an entire group of children with Williams syndrome, who are hypermusical from birth; people with “amusia,” to whom a symphony sounds like the clattering of pots and pans; and a man whose memory spans only seven seconds-for everything but music. Illuminating, inspiring, and utterly unforgettable, Musicophilia is Oliver Sacks' latest masterpiece.

  

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Review: Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

So I found this book fascinating. Having an avid interest in Psychology and a unequivocal love for music, how could I not pick up this book? Though readers might get lost in Sacks' lingo and ... Read full review

Review: Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain

User Review  - Oleg Kagan - Goodreads

The intersection between music and neuroscience is a ripe subject for a book, yet I felt Oliver Sachs' effort at it was uneven. Part of the reason was the sheer variety of aspects with which he ... Read full review

Contents

I
ix
II
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III
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IV
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V
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VI
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VIII
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XIX
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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Oliver Sacks is the author of Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, and many other books, for which he has received numerous awards, including the Hawthornden Prize, a Polk Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and lives in New York City, where he is a practicing neurologist. He recently accepted a new position at Columbia University.

 

www.oliversacks.com

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