The Readers' Advisory Guide to Genre Fiction (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Library Association, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 460 pages
16 Reviews
From psychological suspense and historical fiction to "gentle reads" and romance, this new guide from expert readers' advisor Joyce Saricks explores the many worlds of fiction. Covering fifteen popular genres (including often-neglected literary rifles), each chapter includes a definition of the genre, its characteristics and appeal elements (such as character development, story line, and frame), and its key authors and subgenres. To help you prepare for the eternal "can you recommend a good book on..." question, there are also reader interview tips, reference sources, and guidelines on how to prepare for the questions you will undoubtedly get.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Unreachableshelf - LibraryThing

A guide to readers' advisory for fifteen genres. Especially useful are the lists in each chapter of benchmark authors, introductory authors in each genre for readers of different genres, and recommended authors for readers of the genre wanting to try another genre. Read full review

Review: The Readers' Advisory Guide To Genre Fiction

User Review  - Karrie Stewart - Goodreads

This was my text book for a Readers Advisory class. Great choices for read-a-likes. Breaks down each genre perfectly. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

How to Use This Book
1
Adventure
15
Fantasy
36
Gentle Reads
61
Historical Fiction
80
Horror
106
Literary Fiction
126
Mysteries
145
Science Fiction
261
Suspense
287
Thrillers
312
Westerns
349
Womens Lives and Relationships
370
Tips for the Readers Advisory Interview
393
Readers Advisory Reference Tools
395
The FiveBook Challenge
404

Psychological Suspense
186
Romance
201
Romantic Suspense
241

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 36 - John G. Cawelti, Adventure, Mystery, and Romance: Formula Stories as Art and Popular Culture (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976); and Michael Denning, Mechanic Accents: Dime Novels and Working-Class Culture in America (London: Verso, 1987).
Page 17 - The central fantasy of the adventure story is that of the hero individual or group overcoming obstacles and dangers and accomplishing some important moral mission. Often, though not always, the hero's trials are the result of the machinations of a villain, and, in addition, the hero frequently receives as a kind of side benefit, the favors of one or more attractive young ladies. However, the interplay with the villain and the erotic interests served...

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About the author (2001)

Joyce G. Saricks, former readers' advisor at the Downers Grove Public library, speaks and writes about readers' advisory.

Bibliographic information