Aztecs: An Interpretation

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 24, 1995 - History - 398 pages
7 Reviews
In 1521, the city of Tenochtitlan, magnificent center of the Aztec empire, fell to the Spaniards and their Indian allies. Inga Clendinnen's account of the Aztecs recreates the culture of that city in its last unthreatened years. It provides a vividly dramatic analysis of Aztec ceremony as performance art, binding the key experiences and concerns of social existence in the late imperial city to the mannered violence of their ritual killings.
  

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Review: Aztecs: An Interpretation

User Review  - L. Blankenship - Goodreads

I appreciate Clendinnen's attempts to find the underlying world-view and social structure that made such a blood-thirsty culture functional and even successful -- especially in light of the limited ... Read full review

Review: Aztecs: An Interpretation

User Review  - Johann_tor - Goodreads

This book should have been called "Aztecs: an invention". The author exercises anthropology on what she admits is a picture of historical people that she had to make up herself, since the sources are ... Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
13
V
15
VI
45
VII
85
VIII
87
IX
111
X
141
XV
213
XVI
236
XVII
265
XVIII
267
XIX
275
XX
277
XXI
295
XXII
298

XI
153
XII
174
XIII
206
XIV
211
XXIII
301
XXIV
365
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Inga Clendinnen is Emeritus Scholar in History at La Trobe University. She is also the author of Aztecs (Cambridge, 1991), Reading the Holocaust (Cambridge, 1999), and Ambivalent Conquests: Maya and Spaniard in the Yucatan, 1517-1570 (2nd edition 2003, Cambridge).

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