Splitting Up: Enmeshment and Estrangement in the Process of Divorce

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Guilford Press, 1998 - Psychology - 448 pages
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This thoroughly researched volume examines the emotional process of divorce, from the charactero-logical struggle that leads to the breakup through the difficult adjustments that come after the marriage is over. Illustrated throughout with evocative case examples, the book explores why marriages fail, the feelings and reactions of both the rejecting and rejected partners, the psychodynamics of jealousy, the possibility of reconciliation, and the impact of divorce on children. Psychological and cultural perspectives are employed to provide valuable conceptual and clinical insights for professionals working with individuals and couples in crisis. Presenting cogent observations about the changing nature of modern relationships, this timely volume will prove indispensable to therapists in a wide range of clinical settings, as well as students of couple and family therapy, psychology, psychiatry, and social work.
  

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Contents

Prologue
1
Introduction
11
Introduction
125
The Geometry of the Eternal Triangle
148
CATASTROPHIC AND OTHER SEVERE
189
In the Shadow of the Object
195
Crimes of Passion
207
Psychosomatic Reactions to Rejection in Love
223
Children of Divorce in the New
261
How Feasible Is Cooperation Where
283
The Fairy Tale Divorce for Children
305
Reconciliation
348
Introduction
365
The Issue of Guilt
394
References
417
Index
439

Sexual Dysfunction after Breakup
236

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About the author (1998)

Alvin Pam, PhD, is Principal Psychologist at Bronx Psychiatric Center and Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is also in private practice in Bronx, New York.

Judith Pearson, PhD, is an associate faculty member of the Masterson Institute in New York City. She has worked as a supervising psychologist at Bronx Psychiatric Center and was Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. She is in private practice in New York City.

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