Observing and Cataloguing Nebulae and Star Clusters: From Herschel to Dreyer's New General Catalogue (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 19, 2010 - Science
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The New General Catalogue, originally created in 1888, is the source for referencing bright nebulae and star clusters, both in professional and amateur astronomy. With 7840 entries, it is the most-used historical catalogue of observational astronomy, and NGC numbers are commonly used today. However, the fascinating history of the discovery, observation, description and cataloguing of nebulae and star clusters in the nineteenth century has largely gone untold, until now. This well-researched book is the first comprehensive historical study of the NGC, and is an important resource to all those with an interest in the history of modern astronomy and visual deep-sky observing. It covers the people, observatories, instruments and methods involved in nineteenth-century visual deep-sky observing, as well as prominent deep-sky objects. The book also compares the NGC to modern object data, demonstrating how important the NGC is in observational astronomy today.
  

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Contents

William Herschels observations and parallel activities
14
John Herschels Slough observations
52
Discoveries made in parallel with John Herschels Slough observations
63
John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope
77
The time after Herschels observations until Auwers list of new nebulae
88
Compiling the General Catalogue
188
the supplement to Herschels General Catalogue
225
Compilation of the New General Catalogue
323
Special topics
472
Summary
562
Appendix
567
References
583
Internet and image sources
619
Site index
629
Subject index
647
Copyright

publication analysis and effects
439

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Dr Wolfgang Steinicke, FRAS, is a committee member of the Webb Deep Sky Society and Director of its Nebulae and Clusters section, a core team member of the international NGC/IC Project, Head of the History Section of the VdS, Germany's largest national association of amateur astronomers, and a member of the Working Group for the History of Astronomy of the Astronomische Gesellschaft. He frequently gives conference talks and courses, and contributes to astronomical magazines. This is his fourth book.

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