Answer of the Whig Members of the Legislature of Massachusetts, Constituting a Majority of Both Branches: To the Address of His Excellency Marcus Morton, Delivered in the Convention of the Two Houses, January 22, 1840 (Google eBook)

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Perkins & Marvin, 1840 - Massachusetts - 36 pages
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Page 13 - ... belong to that party which never profits by experience. In regard to corporations, the views of the Governor are so sound, and so well expressed, that, although we are much pressed for room, we must quote what he says; " Of the special acts above referred to, more than one half relate to corporations. One of the vices of the present age, stimulated by extravagance, and a thirst to acquire property without earning it, is a desire to transact ordinary business by means of charters of incorporation.
Page 5 - ... happiness of the whole human family, the democratic principle, which ever seeks to protect the weak, to elevate the depressed, and to secure the just and equal rights of all ; a principle, which is in harmony with pure religion, that establishes the love of God as the first law of morality ; a principle, which, by listening to the voice of reason as it breathes through the people, bows reverently before the dictates of justice, while it spurns at the despotism of man ; a principle, which...
Page 25 - ... free schools which has been transmitted from generation to generation, has improved in its progress, and is now in a high degree of perfection. But it is capable of still further improvement. Recently, great labor has been bestowed upon and great advancement made in some departments of education. But the very improvements in the higher branches, and in the more elevated seminaries, excite the ambition and engross the attention of those most active in the cause of education, and thus expose the...
Page 4 - ... constitution, particularly that new democracy which evaporates in professions of regard for the people, while it is undermining, for selfish purposes, the foundations of the great compact, which alone protects popular rights from anarchy, we shall not dispute with your Excellency's party their exclusive claims to its honors and its profits. But if your Excellency means the true democracy of the constitution, it will probably be new information to the people of this Commonwealth, that the elevation...
Page 15 - ... opportunities for men of moderate property to engage in enterprises beneficial to themselves and the public, which otherwise could be prosecuted only by the very rich. " The man of small property," say they, "by means of a share in a bank, which any one can buy, comes into the market as a money-lender, in fair competition with the great capitalist, though he has himself but a small sum to lend ; and by means of a share in a manufacturing company, equally accessible to all, he enters on equal...
Page 5 - NO. n. 31 dustry ; a principle, which is free from envy and narrow jealousy, and cheerfully acknowledges the benefits of cultivated intelligence and of experience, while it respects, as the paramount fountain of freedom and order, the collective will that includes all the intelligence of the community, the will of the people.
Page 15 - ... all ; and of which every joint stock company might avail itself, without requiring the agency of the legislature." To this the whig members reply, at considerable length, to the effect that they apprehend that his Excellency is mistaken. But the only argument they offer in favor of corporations is, that " they greatly increase the opportunities for men of moderate property to engage in enterprises beneficial to themselves and the public, which otherwise could be prosecuted only by the very rich....
Page 21 - For several years our expenditures have exceeded our revenue; and, consequently, a debt has been accumulating, which, if suffered to increase in the same ratio, will, eventually, involve our state in deep embarrassment, and subject ourselves or our posterity to onerous taxation. We present the extraordinary spectacle of a state, rich in its internal resources, in the treasures it draws from the ocean, in the accumulated capital of many years of labor and economy, in the habitual industry...
Page 5 - the better establishment and the more perfect development of a great principle of civil polity." "A principle," he says, " founded in humanity, guided by benevolence, and looking to the ever progressive improvement and happiness of the whole human family, the democratic principle, which ever seeks to protect the weak, to elevate the depressed, and to secure the just and equal rights of all ; a principle, which is in harmony with pure religion, that establishes the love of God as the first...
Page 5 - founded in humanity, guided by benevolence, and looking to the ever progressive improvement and happiness of the whole human family, the democratic principle, which ever seeks to protect the weak, to elevate the depressed, and to secure the just and equal rights of all ; a principle, which is in harmony with pure religion, that establishes the love of God as the first law of morality ; a principle, which, by listening to the voice of reason as it breathes through the people, bows reverently...

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