Lectures and Essays by the Late William Kingdon Clifford, F.R.S. (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1901 - Science - 127 pages
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Page 118 - Im Anfang war das Wort !» Hier stock ich schon! Wer hilft mir weiter fort? Ich kann das Wort so hoch unmöglich schätzen, Ich muß es anders übersetzen, Wenn ich vom Geiste recht erleuchtet bin. Geschrieben steht: Im Anfang war der Sinn.
Page 340 - ... all those bodies which compose the mighty frame of the world, have not any subsistence without a mind, that their esse is to be perceived or known; that consequently, so long as they are not actually perceived by me, or do not exist in my mind or that of any other created spirit, they must either have no existence at all, or else subsist in the mind of some eternal spirit...
Page 325 - To these arguments, which I trust I cannot be accused of understating, a satisfactory answer will, I conceive, be found, if we advert to one of the characteristic properties of geometrical forms — their capacity of being painted in the imagination with a distinctness equal to reality : in other words, the exact resemblance of our ideas of form to the sensations which suggest them.
Page 118 - Hier stock' ich schon! Wer hilft mir weiter fort? Ich kann das Wort so hoch unmöglich schätzen, Ich muß es anders übersetzen, Wenn ich vom Geiste recht erleuchtet bin. Geschrieben steht: Im Anfang war der Sinn. Bedenke wohl die erste Zeile, Daß deine Feder sich nicht übereile ! Ist es der Sinn, der alles wirkt und schafft? Es sollte stehn: Im Anfang war die Kraft ! Doch, auch indem ich dieses niederschreibe, Schon warnt mich was, daß ich dabei nicht bleibe. Mir hilft der Geist ! Auf einmal...
Page 332 - organised register of infinitely numerous experiences received during the evolution of life, or rather during the evolution of that series of organisms through which the human organism has been reached. The effects of the most uniform and frequent of these experiences have been successively bequeathed, principal and interest, and have slowly mounted to that high intelligence which lies latent in the brain of the infant. Thus it happens that the European inherits from twenty to thirty cubic inches...
Page 142 - Now, it seems to me that the difference between scientific and merely technical thought, not only in these, but in all other instances which I have considered, is just this : Both of them make use of experience to direct human action ; but while technical thought or skill enables a man to deal with the same circumstances that he has met with before, scientific thought enables him to deal with different circumstances that he has never met with before.
Page 42 - There is one thing in the world," Clifford wrote, "more wicked than the desire to command, and that is the will to obey.
Page 328 - And we should not be authorized to substitute observation of the image in our mind, for observation of the reality, if we had not learnt by long-continued experience that the properties of the reality are faithfully represented in the image...
Page 330 - From the universal law that, other things equal, the cohesion of psychical states is proportionate to the frequency with which they have followed one another in experience...
Page 331 - In the sense, then, that there exist in the nervous system certain pre-established relations answering to relations in the environment, there is truth in the doctrine of " forms of intuition" — not the truth which its defenders suppose, but a parallel truth. Corresponding to absolute external relations, there are established in the structure of the nervous system absolute internal relations — relations that are potentially present before birth in the shape of definite nervous connexions ; that...

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