Conversions and Visions in the Writings of African-American Women

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Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1995 - Literary Criticism - 317 pages
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Conversions and Visions in the Writings of African-American Women is a cultural study of the ways in which religion and literature have collaborated to promote self-affirmation among African-American women. From nineteenth-century autobiography to twentieth-century fiction, Kimberly Rae Connor explores the ancestral influence of religion and literature on African-American women's creative development and writings, offering new insights into the authors, their works, and their effect on society.
Drawing upon literary theory, women's studies, and religious studies, Connor expands the categories by which African-American writings are traditionally read. Using the concept of "religious conversion" as a paradigm, Connor examines an African-American woman's achievement of selfhood as a unique experience characterized more by a turning toward and embracing of self than by a turning away from sin. The subsequent achievement of selfhood is then based on the interplay of individual and community identities.
  

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Contents

Voluntary Converts
43
Called to Preach
110
Involuntary Converts
170
Visions
268
Bibliography
291
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About the author (1995)

Kimberly Rae Connor is the author of Conversions and Visions in the Writings of African-American Women and many articles on African-American literature and religion. She teaches at San Francisco University High School.

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