Routledge's readings, selected and arranged by E. Routledge (Google eBook)

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Edmund Routledge
1871
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Page 94 - What do you think the parson found, When he got up and stared around? The poor old chaise in a heap or mound, As if it had been to the mill and ground!
Page 162 - John he cried, But John he cried in vain; That trot became a gallop soon, In spite of curb and rein. So stooping down, as needs he must Who cannot sit upright, He grasped the mane with both his hands And eke with all his might.
Page 162 - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly, Like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both, At last it flew away. Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung ; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children scream'd. Up flew the windows all ; And every soul cried out, Well done ! As loud as he could bawl.
Page 91 - Now in building of chaises, I tell you what, There is always somewhere a weakest spot, — In hub, tire, felloe, in spring or thill, In panel, or crossbar, or floor, or sill, In screw, bolt, thoroughbrace, — lurking still, Find it somewhere you must and will, — Above or below, or within or without, — And that's the reason, beyond a doubt, That a chaise breaks down, but doesn't wear out. But the Deacon swore (as Deacons do, With an "I dew vum...
Page 94 - That there was n'ta chance for one to start. For the wheels were just as strong as the thills, And the floor was just as strong as the...
Page 33 - ... filled him pretty near up to his chin — and set him on the floor. Smiley he went to the swamp and slopped around in the mud for a long time, and finally he ketched a frog, and fetched him in, and give him to this feller, and says : ' Now, if you're ready, set him alongside of Dan'l, with his forepaws even with Dan'l's, and I'll give the word.
Page 28 - Any way that suited the other man would suit him— any way just so's he got a bet, he was satisfied. But still he was lucky, uncommon lucky ; he most always come out winner. He was always ready and laying for a chance; there couldn't be no solit'ry thing mentioned but that...
Page 92 - He sent for lancewood to make the thills, The cross-bars were ash, from the straightest trees, The panels of white-wood, that cuts like cheese, But lasts like iron for things like these; The hubs of logs from the "Settler's ellum...
Page 6 - Gentlemen, what does this mean? Chops and Tomato sauce. Yours, Pickwick ! Chops ! Gracious heavens ! and Tomato sauce! Gentlemen, is the happiness of a sensitive and confiding female to be trifled away by such shallow artifices as these ? The next has no date whatever, which is in itself suspicious. — ' Dear Mrs. B., I shall not be at home till tomorrow. Slow coach.' And then follows this very, very remarkable expression — 'Don't trouble yourself about the warming-pan.
Page 28 - H'm, Reverend Le — well, there was a feller here once by the name of Jim Smiley, in the winter of '49 — or may be it was the spring of '50 — I don't recollect exactly...

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