Early English Poetry, Ballads and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages, Volume 29 (Google eBook)

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Percy Society, 1851 - English literature
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Page 67 - ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE , Of YORK. MARINER: Who lived Eight and Twenty Years, all alone in an un-inhabited Island on the Coast of AMERICA, near the Mouth of the Great River of OROONOQUE; Having been cast on Shore by Shipwreck, wherein all the Men perished but himself. WITH An Account how he was at last as strangely deliver'd by PYRATES. Written by Himself.
Page 9 - twas from mine he took desires Enough t' undo the amorous world. From me he took his sighs and tears, From thee his pride and cruelty ; From me his languishments and fears, And every killing dart from thee. Thus thou and I the god have arm'd And set him up a deity ; But my poor heart alone is harm'd, Whilst thine the victor is, and free!
Page 92 - THOMAS OF READING, OR THE SIXE WORTHIE YEOMEN OF THE WEST. Now the sixth time corrected and enlarged by TD London. Printed by Eliz. Allde for Robert Bird, 1632. In black-letter, A to Kij . in fours. It has a woodcut on the title, with the legend, " Thou shalt labor till thou returne to duste.
Page 50 - The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry; For, having lost but...
Page 46 - Could I still dote upon thy face. Not but all joy in thy brown hair By others may be found; But I must search the black and fair Like...
Page 58 - I'll speed me to the pond, where the high stool On the long plank hangs o'er the muddy pool, That stool, the dread of ev'ry scolding quean ; Yet sure a lover should not die so mean!
Page 59 - But not that passion which with fools' consent Above the reason bears imperious sway, Making their lifetime a perpetual lent, As if a man were born to fast and pray. No, that is not the humour I approve, As either yielding pleasure or promotion : I like a mild and lukewarm zeal in love, Although I do not like it in devotion ; For it...
Page 27 - The Bedlam is in the same garb, with a long staff, and a cow or ox-horn by his side ; but his cloathing is more fantastick and ridiculous ; for, being a madman, he is madly decked and dressed all over with rubins, feathers, cuttings of cloth, and what not ? to make him seem a mad-man, or one distracted, when he is no other than a dissembling knave.
Page xxiii - That man is cowardly base and deserveth not the name of a gentleman or Souldier that is not willinge to sacrifice his life for the honor of his God his Kinge and his Countrie. Lett noe man commend me for...
Page xi - I think the Duke of Buckingham is the cause, and till the king be informed thereof, we shall never go out with honour, nor sit with honour here. That man is the grievance of grievances ; let us set down the causes of all our disasters, and they will all reflect upon him.

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