Constantine: The Hellblazer Collection

Front Cover
Steven T. Seagle, Ron Randall
DC Comics, 2005 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 166 pages
11 Reviews
In celebration of the release of the Warner Bros. Pictures "Constantine" movie this February, DC Comics presents Constantine: The Hellblazer Collection. This trade paperback showcases the official Vertigo comics adaptation of the film, along with three classic issues of John Constantine, Hellblazer: #1. The first issue, Hunger, kicks off the series Hellblazer, the story of John Constantine and Vertigo's longest-running series, and sets a new tone for this character who first appeared in Alan Moore's Swamp Thing. The next, Hold Me, brings Sandman creator Neil Gaiman and his longtime artistic collaborator Dave McKean to the title with a haunting story of fear and loneliness. And finally, A Drop of the Hard Stuff, written by Preacher co-creator Garth Ennis, begins the ongoing feud between Constantine and the Devil. Suggested for Mature Readers.

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Review: Constantine: The Hellblazer Collection (John Constantine Hellblazer Novels #1)

User Review  - Amcii - Goodreads

Incredible graphic novel. Can't wait to get into Gaiman's Sandman series. Read full review

Review: Constantine: The Hellblazer Collection (John Constantine Hellblazer Novels #1)

User Review  - Julie - Goodreads

bits of stories from different writers. kind of a teaser. i was glad that constantine was only drawn like keanu reeves for the first story. because there were bits of stories there was a bit of ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
33
Section 2
92
Section 3
93

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

Neil Gaiman was born in 1960 in Portchester, England. He worked as a journalist and freelance writer for a time, before deciding to try his hand at comic books. Some of his work has appeared in publications such as "Time Out," "The Sunday Times," "Punch" and "The Observer." Gaiman's first comic endeavor was the graphic novel series "The Sandman." It is what Gaiman is most famous for and the series has won every major industry award, including the 1991 World Fantasy Award for best short story, making it the first comic ever to win a literary award. "The Sandman" series has outsold both "Batman" and "Superman" comics, selling over a million copies a year. The collections have sold over 750,000 copies in both paperback and hardcover and Warner Bothers has optioned the rights to Sandman. Gaiman is the co-originator and co-editor of The Utterly Comic Relief, an organization which raises money to maintain First Amendment Rights for comic book creators. In 1991, the organization raised over 45,000 pounds for the Comic Relief Charity. Gaiman has also co-authored a book with Terry Pratchett called "Good Omens" and wrote "Ghastly Beyond Belief" in 1985 and "Don't Panic" in 1987. He has edited a book of poetry entitled "Now We Are Sick" and his essays have appeared in such publications as "Horror: 100 Best Books and 100 Great Detectives." Gaiman has also delved into children's books, writing "The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish" which was selected by "Newsweek" as one of the Best Children's Books of 1997. In 2009 Gaiman won the Newbery Award for "The Graveyard Book.

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