Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage (Google eBook)

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University of California Press, Feb 19, 2007 - Family & Relationships - 298 pages
25 Reviews
Millie Acevedo bore her first child before the age of 16 and dropped out of high school to care for her newborn. Now 27, she is the unmarried mother of three and is raising her kids in one of Philadelphia's poorest neighborhoods. Would she and her children be better off if she had waited to have them and had married their father first? Why do so many poor American youth like Millie continue to have children before they can afford to take care of them? Over a span of five years, sociologists Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas talked in-depth with 162 low-income single moms like Millie to learn how they think about marriage and family. "Promises I Can Keep "offers an intimate look at what marriage and motherhood mean to these women and provides the most extensive on-the-ground study to date of why they put children before marriage despite the daunting challenges they know lie ahead.
  

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Review: Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage

User Review  - Margaret Zhang - Goodreads

An excellent immersion into the values and incentives of women in low-income neighborhoods. I am much enriched by reading this book. Read full review

Review: Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage

User Review  - Karen Cox - Goodreads

This was written I the 90's but hasn't gotten stale. The authors present the world of poor unwed mothers using the words of the mothers themselves. It is the most effective way to show these women as ... Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2007)

Kathryn Edin is Professor of Public Policy and Management at the Kennedy School of Government and a Faculty Affiliate with the Sociology Department at Harvard University. She is the coauthor of "Promises I Can Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage "and "Making Ends Meet: How Low Income Single Mothers Survive Welfare and Low Wage Work. " Timothy Nelson is Lecturer in Social Policy at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is the author of "Every Time I Feel the Spirit: Religious Experience and Ritual in an African American Church.

Maria Kefalas is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Saint Joseph's University.

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