Theism. Baird lect., 1876 (Google eBook)

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1877
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Page 176 - When he established the clouds above : When he strengthened the fountains of the deep : When he gave to the sea his decree, That the waters should not pass his commandment: When he appointed the foundations of the earth : 235 Then I was by him, as one brought up with him : And I was daily his delight, Rejoicing always before him ; Rejoicing in the habitable part of his earth ; And my delights were with the sons of men.
Page 314 - O May I Join The Choir Invisible! O may I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence...
Page 229 - He, that has light within his own clear breast, May sit in the centre, and enjoy bright day: But he, that hides a dark soul and foul thoughts, Benighted walks under the mid-day sun; Himself is his own dungeon.
Page 64 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 176 - The Lord possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was.
Page 423 - Is there no God, then; but at best an absentee God, sitting idle, ever since the first Sabbath, at the outside of his Universe, and seeing it go.
Page 416 - tis her privilege. Through all the years of this our life, to lead From joy to joy; for she can so inform The mind that is within us, so impress With quietness and beauty, and so feed With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues. Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all The dreary intercourse of daily life, Shall e'er prevail against us, or disturb Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold Is full of blessings.
Page 113 - None of the processes of nature, since the time when nature began, have produced the slightest difference in the properties of any molecule. We are therefore unable to ascribe either the existence of the molecules or the identity of their properties to the operation of any of the causes which we call natural.
Page 414 - In sober truth, nearly all the things which men are hanged or imprisoned for doing to one another, are nature's every day performances. Killing, the most criminal act recognized by human laws, Nature does once to every being that lives; and in a large proportion of cases, after protracted tortures such as only the greatest monsters whom we read of ever purposely inflicted on their living fellow-creatures. If...
Page 261 - In the darkest hour through which a human soul can pass, whatever else is doubtful, this at least is certain. If there be no God, and no future state, yet even then, it is better to be generous than selfish, better to be chaste than licentious^ better to be true than false, better to be brave than to be a coward.

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