Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of Middle-class Culture in America, 1830-1870

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Yale University Press, 1982 - Social Science - 262 pages
4 Reviews
Karen Halttunen draws a vivid picture of the social and cultural development of the upwardly mobile middle class, basing her study on a survey of the conduct manuals and fashion magazines of mid-nineteenth-century America.
  

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Review: Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of Middle-class Culture in America, 1830-1870

User Review  - Bernadette Loeffel-Atkins - Goodreads

This has to be one of my favorite historical culture books. Halttunen knows her stuff. Her research is amazing. This is a study of middle-class culture in America from 1830-1870. Her study of the ... Read full review

Review: Confidence Men and Painted Women: A Study of Middle-class Culture in America, 1830-1870

User Review  - Lesley - Goodreads

Engaging, a true social history of the sentimental period in the United States. Takes a deeper look into culture, including dress, etiquette, and the social norms of life in the early to mid 1800's by ... Read full review

Contents

The Era of the Confidence Man
1
Hypocrisy and Sincerity in the World of Strangers
33
Sentimental Culture and the Problem of Fashion
56
Sentimental Culture and the Problem of Etiquette
92
A Study in Sentimental Ritual
124
The Confidence Man in Corporate America
198
Notes
211
Selected Bibliography
239
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About the author (1982)

Karen Halttunen, professor of history at the University of Southern California, earned her Ph.D. from Yale University. Her works include CONFIDENCE MEN AND PAINTED WOMEN: A STUDY OF MIDDLE-CLASS CULTURE IN AMERICA, 1830-1870 (1982) and MURDER MOST FOUL: THE KILLER AND THE AMERICAN GOTHIC IMAGINATION (1998). She edited THE BLACKWELL COMPANION TO AMERICAN CULTURAL HISTORY (2008) and co-edited, with Lewis Perry, MORAL PROBLEMS IN AMERICAN LIFE: NEW ESSAYS ON CULTURAL HISTORY (1998). As president of the American Studies Association and as vice-president of the Teaching Division of the American Historical Association, she has actively promoted K-16 collaboration in teaching history. She has held fellowships from the Guggenheim and Mellon Foundations, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Huntington Library, and the National Humanities Center, and has been principal investigator on several Teaching American History grants from the Department of Education.

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