Liberia: or, The early history & signal preservation of the American colony of free negroes on the coast of Africa (Google eBook)

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Waugh & Innes, 1833 - African Americans - 226 pages
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Page 11 - ... continue with their parents to a certain age, then be brought up, at the public expence, to tillage, arts or sciences, according to their geniusses, till the females should be eighteen, and the males twenty-one years of age, when they should be colonized to such place as the circumstances of the time should render most proper...
Page 186 - Resolved, That the proceedings of this meeting be signed by the Chairman and Secretary, and published in both of the newspapers of Iowa City.
Page 13 - Society, as defined in the second article of its constitution, " is to promote and execute a plan for colonizing, with their consent, the free people of color residing in our country, in Africa, or such other place, as Congress shall deem expedient...
Page 60 - ... distance ! Every shot literally spent its force in a solid mass of living human flesh! Their fire suddenly terminated. A savage yell was raised, which filled the dismal forest with a momentary horror. It gradually died away; and the whole host disappeared.
Page 164 - The first consideration which caused our voluntary removal to this country, and the object, which we still regard with the deepest concern, is liberty liberty, in the sober, simple, but complete sense of the word: not a licentious liberty, nor a liberty without government, or which should place us without the restraint of salutary laws but that liberty of speech, action, and conscience, which distinguishes the free enfranchised citizens...
Page 37 - I promise you protection. If these people give you further disturbance, send for me. And I swear, if they oblige me to come again to quiet them, I will do it to purpose, by taking their heads from their shoulders ; as I did old king George's, on my last visit to the coast, to settle disputes.
Page 170 - Cotton, coffee, indigo and the sugar-cane, are all the spontaneous growth of our forests; and may be cultivated, at pleasure, to any extent, by such as are disposed. The same may be said of rice, indian corn, guinea corn, millet, and too many species of fruits and vegetables to be enumerated.
Page 114 - Every emigrant to Africa is a missionary carrying with him credentials in the holy cause of civilization, religion, and free institutions.
Page 172 - Judge, then, of the feelings with which we hear the motives and the doings of the Colonization Society traduced and that, too, by men too ignorant to know what that Society has accomplished ; too weak to look through its plans and intentions; or too dishonest to acknowledge either. But, without pretending to any prophetic sagacity, we can certainly predict to that Society, the ultimate triumph of their hopes and labours ; and disappointment and defeat to all who oppose them. Men may theorize,...
Page 15 - States be, and he is hereby, authorized to make such regulations and arrangements as he may deem expedient for the safe-keeping, support, and removal beyond the limits of the United States, of all such negroes, mulattoes, or persons of color...

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